History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<July 1> with between 200 and 300 men. moved his troops near the mob force, and came up and conversed with me on the subject— after conversing some time on the subject, Major Hughes came and informed that his men were mutinizing, and the mob were determined to fall on the Saints in . I having a Col’s commission under , was commanded to call out my troops forthwith, and to use s own language “kill every G–d d—n mobocrat you can find in the country or make them prisoners, and if they come upon you give them hell”— he then returned his troops and gave them an address, stating the interview he had with me, and he also said to the mob, that if they were so disposed they could go on with their measures— that he considered that with the militia under his command all-sufficient to quell every God d—n mobocrat in the , and if they did not feel disposed so to do, to go home or G–d d—n them he would kill every one of them.— The mob then dispersed. During these movements neither Joseph Smith nor any of those of were at only those who were settlers and legal citizens of the place. The mob again assembled and went to , Carroll county, there being a small branch of the church at that place, but of the transactions at this place I have no personal knowledge. They succeeded in driving the Church from that place, some to the East and some to the west, &c. This increased their ardor, and with redoubled forces from several counties of the , they returned to to renew the attack, many [illegible] wanton attacks and violations of the rights of citizen took place at this time from the hands of this hellish band. I believing forbearance no longer to be a virtue, again sent to the for military aid, who ordered out . came part of the way, but fearing his men would mutinize and join the mob, he came on ahead and conversed with me a considerable time. The night previous to his arrival the wife of was [HC 3:442] driven from her house by this ruthless mob, and came into , a distance of three miles, carrying two children on her hips, one of which was then rising of two years old, the other six or eight months old— the snow being over shoe-mouth deep, and she having to wade which was at this time waist deep, and the mob burnt the house and every thing they had in it— and , passing the ruins thereof, seemed fired with indignation at their hellish conduct, and said he had hitherto thought it imprudent to call upon the Militia under my command in consequence of popular opinion, but he now considered it no more than justice that I should have command of my own troops, and said to me, “I therefore command you forthwith to raise your companies immediately and take such course as you may deem best in order to disperse the mob from this .” I then called out sixty men and placed them under the command of Captain , and I also took about the same number— was ordered to , where a party of the mob were located, and I to Millport, where another party was located. I and formed the troops under our command, and addressed them as follows:—
“Gentlemen, I deplore your situation I regret that transactions of this nature should have transpired in our once happy — your condition is certainly [p. 1633]
July 1 with between 200 and 300 men. moved his troops near the mob force, and came up and conversed with me on the subject— after conversing some time on the subject, Major Hughes came and informed that his men were mutinizing, and the mob were determined to fall on the Saints in . I having a Col’s commission under , was commanded to call out my troops forthwith, and to use s own language “kill every G–d d—n mobocrat you can find in the or make them prisoners, and if they come upon you give them hell”— he then returned his troops and gave them an address, stating the interview he had with me, and he also said to the mob, that if they were so disposed they could go on with their measures— that he considered that with the militia under his command all-sufficient to quell every God d—n mobocrat in the , and if they did not feel disposed so to do, to go home or G–d d—n them he would kill every one of them.— The mob then dispersed. During these movements neither Joseph Smith nor any of those of were at only those who were settlers and legal citizens of the place. The mob again assembled and went to , Carroll county, there being a small branch of the church at that place, but of the transactions at this place I have no personal knowledge. They succeeded in driving the Church from that place, some to the East and some to the west, &c. This increased their ardor, and with redoubled forces from several counties of the , they returned to to renew the attack, many wanton attacks and violations of the rights of citizen took place at this time from the hands of this hellish band. I believing forbearance no longer to be a virtue, again sent to the for military aid, who ordered out . came part of the way, but fearing his men would mutinize and join the mob, he came on ahead and conversed with me a considerable time. The night previous to his arrival the wife of was [HC 3:442] driven from her house by this ruthless mob, and came into , a distance of three miles, carrying two children on her hips, one of which was then rising of two years old, the other six or eight months old— the snow being over shoe-mouth deep, and she having to wade which was at this time waist deep, and the mob burnt the house and every thing they had in it— and , passing the ruins thereof, seemed fired with indignation at their hellish conduct, and said he had hitherto thought it imprudent to call upon the Militia under my command in consequence of popular opinion, but he now considered it no more than justice that I should have command of my own troops, and said to me, “I therefore command you forthwith to raise your companies immediately and take such course as you may deem best in order to disperse the mob from this .” I then called out sixty men and placed them under the command of Captain , and I also took about the same number— was ordered to , where a party of the mob were located, and I to Millport, where another party was located. I and formed the troops under our command, and addressed them as follows:—
“Gentlemen, I deplore your situation I regret that transactions of this nature should have transpired in our once happy — your condition is certainly [p. 1633]
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