History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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upon us, we praised the Lord God, and rejoiced exceedingly.
About this time a spirit of persecution began <again> to manifest itself against us in  the neighborhood where I now resided, which was commenced by a man of the  methodist persuasion, who professed to be a minister of God, and whose name was  [blank]. This man came to understand <understood>, that my and  his family had promised us protection, and were friendly; and enquiring into the  work, and knowing that if he could get him turned against me, my friends in  that place would be but few, he accordingly went to visit my father in law, and  told him falsehoods concerning me, of the most shameful nature, which turned the  Old gentleman and his family so much against us, that they would no longer  promise us protection, nor believe our doctrines.
Towards the latter end of August I (in company with and  , and my brother ) visited the at , N.Y. Well knowing the determined hostilities <hostility> of our enemies in that  quarter, and also knowing that it was our duty to visit the church, we had  called upon our Heavenly Father in mighty prayer, that he would grant us  an opportunity of meeting with them; that he would blind the eyes of our ene mies, so that they would not know us, and that we might on this occasion  return unmolested.— Our prayers were not in vain, for, when within  a little distance of s place, we encountered a large company at  work upon the public road, among <whom> were several of our most bitter enemies.  They looked earnestly at us, but not knowing us, we passed on with out inter ruption. We that evening assembled the church, and them, par took of the , and held a happy meeting, having much reason to  rejoice in the God of our salvation, and sing Hosannas to his holy name.
Next morning we set out on our return home, and although our enemies had  offered a reward of five dollars, to any one who would give them information  of our arrival, yet did we get clear out of the neighborhood, without the least  annoyance, and arrived at home in safety.— Some few days afterwards  however, came to my place, and from him we learnt  that very shortly after our departure the mob had came to know of our having  been there, when they immediately collected together, and had threatened the  brethren and very much annoyed them during all that day.
Mean time Brother Knight had came, with his waggon, prepared  to move my family, &c, &c, to , N Y. Mr Whitmer having heard  of the persecutions which had been got up against us at , Penn, had  invited <us> to go and live with him; and during the last week of August we  arrived at , amidst the congratulations of our brethren and friends.
To our great grief however, we soon found that Satan had been lying in  wait to deceive, and seeking whom he might devour. Brother [p. 53]
upon us, we praised the Lord God, and rejoiced exceedingly.
About this time a spirit of persecution began again to manifest itself against us in the neighborhood where I now resided, which was commenced by a man of the methodist persuasion, who professed to be a minister of God, [blank]. This man understood, that my and his family had promised us protection, and were friendly; and enquiring into the work, and knowing that if he could get him turned against me, my friends in that place would be but few, he accordingly went to visit my father in law, and told him falsehoods concerning me, of the most shameful nature, which turned the Old gentleman and his family so much against us, that they would no longer promise us protection, nor believe our doctrines.
Towards the latter end of August I (in company with and , and my brother ) visited the at , N.Y. Well knowing the determined hostility of our enemies in that quarter, and also knowing that it was our duty to visit the church, we had called upon our Heavenly Father in mighty prayer, that he would grant us an opportunity of meeting with them; that he would blind the eyes of our enemies, so that they would not know us, and that we might on this occasion return unmolested.— Our prayers were not in vain, for, when within a little distance of s place, we encountered a large company at work upon the public road, among whom were several of our most bitter enemies. They looked earnestly at us, but not knowing us, we passed on with out interruption. We that evening assembled the church, and them, partook of the , and held a happy meeting, having much reason to rejoice in the God of our salvation, and sing Hosannas to his holy name.
Next morning we set out on our return home, and although our enemies had offered a reward of five dollars, to any one who would give them information of our arrival, yet did we get clear out of the neighborhood, without the least annoyance, and arrived at home in safety.— Some few days afterwards however, came to my place, and from him we learnt that very shortly after our departure the mob had came to know of our having been there, when they immediately collected together, and had threatened the brethren and very much annoyed them during all that day.
Mean time Brother Knight had came, with his waggon, prepared to move my family, &c, &c, to , N Y. Mr Whitmer having heard of the persecutions which had been got up against us at , Penn, had invited us to go and live with him; and during the last week of August we arrived at , amidst the congratulations of our brethren and friends.
To our great grief however, we soon found that Satan had been lying in wait to deceive, and seeking whom he might devour. Brother [p. 53]
Page 53