Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 240
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for protection in the event of any voilence being used towards us knowing that our innocence with reguard to all the accusations in circulation will be duly evidenced before an enlightened public.
Any service we can do the at any time will be cheerfully done, for our ambition is to be Serviceable to our .
With sentiments of respect and esteem I remain your humble Servant
Joseph Smith
His Excellency
Letter from Thomas Carlin • 27 July 1842
Copy of a Letter from
Gov. of the State of
July 27th. 1842
Dear Sir,
Your communication of the 25th. instant, together the petitions of the Citizens of the City of , both male and female, were delivered to me last evening by Brevit Major General , also a report of Esqr Secty, of the Nauvoo Legion, of the proceedings of a Court Martial of Brevit Majors General, had upon Charges prefered against Major Genl, upon which trial the court found the defendant guilty and sentenced him to be Cashiered, all of which have been Considered. In reply to your expressed apprehensions of “the possibility of an attack, upon the peaceable inhabitants of the City of , and vicinity, through the intrigues and false representations of and others, and your request that I would issue official Orders to you, to have the Nauvoo Legion in reddiness, to be called out at a moments warning in defence of the peaceable Citizens &c. I must say that I can not conceive of the least probability or scarcely possibility, of an attack of Violence upon the citizens of from any quarter whatever— and as utterly impossible that such attack is contemplated by any sufficient number of persons to excite the least apprehension of danger or injury, and whilst I should consider it my imperative duty to promptly take measures, to suppress and repel any invasion by violence, of the peoples rights, I nevertheless think that it is not my province to interpose my official authority gratuitousley when no such exigency exists.
From the late disclosures, as made by it is not strange that the apprehensions of the Citizens of are [p. 240]
for protection in the event of any voilence being used towards us knowing that our innocence with reguard to all the accusations in circulation will be duly evidenced before an enlightened public.
Any service we can do the at any time will be cheerfully done, for our ambition is to be Serviceable to our .
With sentiments of respect and esteem I remain your humble Servant
Joseph Smith
His Excellency
Letter from Thomas Carlin • 27 July 1842
Copy of a Letter from
Gov. of the State of
July 27th. 1842
Dear Sir,
Your communication of the 25th. instant, together the petitions of the Citizens of the City of , both male and female, were delivered to me last evening by Brevit Major General , also a report of Esqr Secty, of the Nauvoo Legion, of the proceedings of a Court Martial of Brevit Majors General, had upon Charges prefered against Major Genl, upon which trial the court found the defendant guilty and sentenced him to be Cashiered, all of which have been Considered. In reply to your expressed apprehensions of “the possibility of an attack, upon the peaceable inhabitants of the City of , and vicinity, through the intrigues and false representations of and others, and your request that I would issue official Orders to you, to have the Nauvoo Legion in reddiness, to be called out at a moments warning in defence of the peaceable Citizens &c. I must say that I can not conceive of the least probability or scarcely possibility, of an attack of Violence upon the citizens of from any quarter whatever— and as utterly impossible that such attack is contemplated by any sufficient number of persons to excite the least apprehension of danger or injury, and whilst I should consider it my imperative duty to promptly take measures, to suppress and repel any invasion by violence, of the peoples rights, I nevertheless think that it is not my province to interpose my official authority gratuitousley when no such exigency exists.
From the late disclosures, as made by it is not strange that the apprehensions of the Citizens of are [p. 240]
Page 240