Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 239
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mere discharge of an official duty on my part, enjoined upon me by the constitution and laws, of this , and of the Could not possibley engender feelings of such deep malignity. Be assured that this matter gives me no uneaseness, nor would the subject now have been mentioned, had you not requested a reply to your enquiries I have seen your denial published in the wasp of the prediction attributed to you, of the death (or assassination) of , be that true or false, nothing has Contributed more towards fixing the belief upon the public mind, that you had made such prediction, than the repeated statements of a portion of your followers, that the manner of his death had been revealed to you— and their exultation that it must needs be fulfilled.
In reference to your request to be advised, how you should act in Case a mob should Come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any corse for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first law of nature viz.— to defend your own rights, because were I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on, whilst those rights were violated, and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them.
I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at present, any real cause for the apprehension of a mob Coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it.
very respectfully your Obt. Servt.
Genrl Joseph Smith—
Letter to Thomas Carlin • 30 July 1842
Copy of a letter to
Gov. of the state of
July 30th. 1842
Esteemed Sir,
Your favour of the 27th. inst. for Brevet Major Gen. is before me. I cannot let this opportunity pass without tendering to you my Warmest thanks for the friendly treatment my as well as those with her received at your hands during the late visit, and also for the friendly feelings breathed forth in your letter. Your may be assured that they are duly appreciated by me and shall ever be reciprocated.
I am perfectly satisfied with regard to the subject under consideration and with your remarks. I shall consider myself and our citizens secure from harm under the broad canopy of the Law under your administration, We look to you [p. 239]
mere discharge of an official duty on my part, enjoined upon me by the constitution and laws, of this , and of the Could not possibley engender feelings of such deep malignity. Be assured that this matter gives me no uneaseness, nor would the subject now have been mentioned, had you not requested a reply to your enquiries I have seen your denial published in the wasp of the prediction attributed to you, of the death (or assassination) of , be that true or false, nothing has Contributed more towards fixing the belief upon the public mind, that you had made such prediction, than the repeated statements of a portion of your followers, that the manner of his death had been revealed to you— and their exultation that it must needs be fulfilled.
In reference to your request to be advised, how you should act in Case a mob should Come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any corse for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first law of nature viz.— to defend your own rights, because were I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on, whilst those rights were violated, and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them.
I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at present, any real cause for the apprehension of a mob Coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it.
very respectfully your Obt. Servt.
Genrl Joseph Smith—
Letter to Thomas Carlin • 30 July 1842
Copy of a letter to
Gov. of the state of
July 30th. 1842
Esteemed Sir,
Your favour of the 27th. inst. for Brevet Major Gen. is before me. I cannot let this opportunity pass without tendering to you my Warmest thanks for the friendly treatment my as well as those with her received at your hands during the late visit, and also for the friendly feelings breathed forth in your letter. Your may be assured that they are duly appreciated by me and shall ever be reciprocated.
I am perfectly satisfied with regard to the subject under consideration and with your remarks. I shall consider myself and our citizens secure from harm under the broad canopy of the Law under your administration, We look to you [p. 239]
Page 239