Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 129
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rapidly filling up the two latter Counties. Those Counties, when the Mormons first commenced their settlement, were for the most part wild and uncultivated, and they had converted them into well improved & large farms, well stocked. Lands had risen in value to $10. and even $25. per acre, and those Counties were rapidly advancing in cultivation and wealth: that in August, 1838, a riot commenced, growing out of an attempt of a Mormon to vote, which resulted in creating great excitement and the perpetration of many scenes of lawless outrage, which are set forth in the petition; that they were finally compelled to fly from those Counties; and on the 11th Oct. 1838 they sought safety by that means, with their families, leaving many of their effects behind: that they had previously applied to the constitued authorities of for protection, but in vain. They allege that they were pursued by the mob, that conflicts ensued; deaths occured on each; and, finally, a force was organized under the authority of the of the State of , with orders to drive the Mormons from the or exterminate them. The Mormons thereupon determined to make no further resistance, but to submit themselves to the Authorities of the . Several Mormons were arrested and imprisoned on a Charge of treason against the , and the rest amounting to about 15,000, Souls, fled into other States, principally, in where they now reside
The petition is drawn up at great length, and sets forth with, feeling and eloquence, the wrongs of which they complain, justifies their own conduct, and aggravate that of those whom they call their persecutors, and concludes by saying that they see no redress, unless it be obtained of the Congress, of the to whom they make their solemn last appeal, as American citizens, as christians, and as men, To which decision they say they will submit. The committee have examined the case presented by the petition, and heard the views [p. 129]
rapidly filling up the two latter Counties. Those Counties, when the Mormons first commenced their settlement, were for the most part wild and uncultivated, and they had converted them into well improved & large farms, well stocked. Lands had risen in value to $10. and even $25. per acre, and those Counties were rapidly advancing in cultivation and wealth: that in August, 1838, a riot commenced, growing out of an attempt of a Mormon to vote, which resulted in creating great excitement and the perpetration of many scenes of lawless outrage, which are set forth in the petition; that they were finally compelled to fly from those Counties; and on the 11th Oct. 1838 they sought safety by that means, with their families, leaving many of their effects behind: that they had previously applied to the constitued authorities of for protection, but in vain. They allege that they were pursued by the mob, that conflicts ensued; deaths occured on each; and, finally, a force was organized under the authority of the of the State of , with orders to drive the Mormons from the or exterminate them. The Mormons thereupon determined to make no further resistance, but to submit themselves to the Authorities of the . Several Mormons were arrested and imprisoned on a Charge of treason against the , and the rest amounting to about 15,000, Souls, fled into other States, principally, in where they now reside
The petition is drawn up at great length, and sets forth with, feeling and eloquence, the wrongs of which they complain, justifies their own conduct, and aggravate that of those whom they call their persecutors, and concludes by saying that they see no redress, unless it be obtained of the Congress, of the to whom they make their solemn last appeal, as American citizens, as christians, and as men, To which decision they say they will submit. The committee have examined the case presented by the petition, and heard the views [p. 129]
Page 129