History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​February 20​> inoffensive and innocent of crime; had the Times and Seasons, from which I read ’s letter to ; I also referred to ’s letter from Pike County; the Clerks and others, respecting our character in their section of Country. I gave them some hints of the Massacre, and the murder of the two little boys, but referred them more particularly to the documents for information concerning those things, and furthermore that I had not come here to instruct them in what they were to do in this case; but to present them with the facts. having all confidence in this honorable body (the Congress) believing them to be honorable men. [HC 4:81] I demanded from them a restitution of all our rights and privileges as Citizens of the , and damages for all the losses we had sustained in consequence of our persecutions, and expulsion from the . And told them we could have recourse no where else on Earth, that I knew of— that we could not sue an army of Soldiers, neither could we go into the to sue any one else. I told them that I knew not how far Congress had jurisdiction in this case, or how far they had not, but as far as they had, we claimed the exercise of it for our relief; for we were an injured people. These and some others were the principle subjects of my speech— after which said he was once in the Mormon’s favor; but afterwards learned that it was impossible to live among them, for they stole their Neighbor’s hogs— and there being so much testimony he believed it &c. &c. I replied something like this— making statements was one thing, and proving them was another— then said he wished me to answer one thing. Viz. If the Legislature of did not refuse to investigate the subject of our difficulties, solely on account of the trials then pending— In reply, I assured him that I knew they had refused us an investigation; but as to that being the cause I did not know, but told him they might have done it, when those trials were discharged— He seemed to think it injustice for Congress to take it up before the Legislature had acted on it— I occupied all but a few minutes of the time, when the Senate were to go into Session, so they adjourned until the morrow at ten o’clock; when the Missourians are to reply— observed, that there was a Gentleman whom he would have before the Committee on the morrow; who lived in the Upper part of , that knew every thing relative to the affair,— I presume he is to put in his gab. I suppose I must attend the Committee as I am solicited by the Chairman— but I would rather take a flogging; because I must sit still, and hear a volubility of lies concerning myself and brethren— Lies I say, for they have nothing but lies to tell, that will in the least<​degree​> justify their conduct in . said he had written to to get all the evidence taken before . so that if the thing must come up he would be prepared to have a full investigation [p. 1017]
February 20 inoffensive and innocent of crime; had the Times and Seasons, from which I read ’s letter to ; I also referred to ’s letter from Pike County; the Clerks and others, respecting our character in their section of Country. I gave them some hints of the Massacre, and the murder of the two little boys, but referred them more particularly to the documents for information concerning those things, and furthermore that I had not come here to instruct them in what they were to do in this case; but to present them with the facts. having all confidence in this honorable body (the Congress) believing them to be honorable men. [HC 4:81] I demanded from them a restitution of all our rights and privileges as Citizens of the , and damages for all the losses we had sustained in consequence of our persecutions, and expulsion from the . And told them we could have recourse no where else on Earth, that I knew of— that we could not sue an army of Soldiers, neither could we go into the to sue any one else. I told them that I knew not how far Congress had jurisdiction in this case, or how far they had not, but as far as they had, we claimed the exercise of it for our relief; for we were an injured people. These and some others were the principle subjects of my speech— after which said he was once in the Mormon’s favor; but afterwards learned that it was impossible to live among them, for they stole their Neighbor’s hogs— and there being so much testimony he believed it &c. &c. I replied something like this— making statements was one thing, and proving them was another— then said he wished me to answer one thing. Viz. If the Legislature of did not refuse to investigate the subject of our difficulties, solely on account of the trials then pending— In reply, I assured him that I knew they had refused us an investigation; but as to that being the cause I did not know, but told him they might have done it, when those trials were discharged— He seemed to think it injustice for Congress to take it up before the Legislature had acted on it— I occupied all but a few minutes of the time, when the Senate were to go into Session, so they adjourned until the morrow at ten o’clock; when the Missourians are to reply— observed, that there was a Gentleman whom he would have before the Committee on the morrow; who lived in the Upper part of , that knew every thing relative to the affair,— I presume he is to put in his gab. I suppose I must attend the Committee as I am solicited by the Chairman— but I would rather take a flogging; because I must sit still, and hear a volubility of lies concerning myself and brethren— Lies I say, for they have nothing but lies to tell, that will in the leastdegree justify their conduct in . said he had written to to get all the evidence taken before . so that if the thing must come up he would be prepared to have a full investigation [p. 1017]
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