History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the citizens of . This intimidates a great many, particularly females and children, and no military guard would diminish their fears so far as to induce them to attend the court in that ; this with other serious difficulties will give a decided advantage to the offenders, in a court of enquiry, while they triumph in power, numbers, &c.
The citizens of , are well aware that they have this advantage, and the leaders of the faction if they must submit to such a court, would gladly hasten it. The are anxious for a thorough investigation into the whole affair, if their testimony can be taken without so great peril as they have reason to fear. It is my opinion from present appearances, that not one fourth of the witnesses of our people, can be prevailed upon to go into to testify. The influence of the party that compose that faction is considerable, and this influence operates in some degree, upon the drafted Militia so far as to lessen confidence in the loyalty of that body: and I am satisfied that the influence of the faction, will not be entirely put down while they have advocates among certain religious sects.
Knowing that your Excellency must be aware of the unequal contest in which we are engaged, and that the little handful that compose our church, are not the only sufferers that feel the oppressive hand of priestly power. With these difficulties and many others, not enumerated, it would be my wish to adopt such measures as are best calculated to allay the rage of , and restore the injured to their rightful possessions; and to this end I would Suggest the propriety of purchasing the possessions of the most violent leaders of the faction, and if the[y] assent, to this proposition, of about twenty of the most influential in that (which would embrace the very leaders of the faction,) could be obtained, I think the majority would cease in their persecutions, at least, when a due exercise of Executive counsel and authority was manifested. I suggest this measure, because it is of a pacific nature, well knowing that no legal steps [p. 415]
the citizens of . This intimidates a great many, particularly females and children, and no military guard would diminish their fears so far as to induce them to attend the court in that ; this with other serious difficulties will give a decided advantage to the offenders, in a court of enquiry, while they triumph in power, numbers, &c.
The citizens of , are well aware that they have this advantage, and the leaders of the faction if they must submit to such a court, would gladly hasten it. The are anxious for a thorough investigation into the whole affair, if their testimony can be taken without so great peril as they have reason to fear. It is my opinion from present appearances, that not one fourth of the witnesses of our people, can be prevailed upon to go into to testify. The influence of the party that compose that faction is considerable, and this influence operates in some degree, upon the drafted Militia so far as to lessen confidence in the loyalty of that body: and I am satisfied that the influence of the faction, will not be entirely put down while they have advocates among certain religious sects.
Knowing that your Excellency must be aware of the unequal contest in which we are engaged, and that the little handful that compose our church, are not the only sufferers that feel the oppressive hand of priestly power. With these difficulties and many others, not enumerated, it would be my wish to adopt such measures as are best calculated to allay the rage of , and restore the injured to their rightful possessions; and to this end I would Suggest the propriety of purchasing the possessions of the most violent leaders of the faction, and if they assent, to this proposition, of about twenty of the most influential in that (which would embrace the very leaders of the faction,) could be obtained, I think the majority would cease in their persecutions, at least, when a due exercise of Executive counsel and authority was manifested. I suggest this measure, because it is of a pacific nature, well knowing that no legal steps [p. 415]
Page 415