History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 485
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to themselves, But I should travel out of the line of my strict duty, as chief executive officer of the government, were I to take upon myself the task of effecting a compromise between the parties. Had I not supposed it possible, yes, probable, that I should, as executive of the state, have to act, I should before now, have interfered individually, in the way you suggest, or in some other way, in order if possible to effect a compromise. Uncommitted, as I am, to either party, I shall feel no embarrassment in doing my duty; though it may be done with the most extreme regret. My duty in the relation in which I now stand to the parties, is plain and strait forward. By an official interposition, I might embarrass my course, and urge a measure for the purpose of effecting a compromise, and in the end, it should fail, and in the end, should I find it my duty to act contrary to the advice I had given, it might be said, that I either advised wrong: or that I was partial to one side or the other, in giving advice that I would not, as an officer, follow, A more clear, and indisputable right does not exist, that the Mormon people, who were expelled from their homes in , to return and live on their lands, and if they cannot be persuaded as a matter of policy, to give up that right, or to qualify it, my course, as the Cheif executive officer of the state is a plain one. The constitution of the , declares, “that the citizens of each state shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states.” Then we cannot interdict any people who have a political franchise in the from emigrating to this state, nor from choosing what part of the state they will settle in, provided they do not trespass on the property or rights of others. Our state constitution declares that the people’s “right to bear arms, in defence of themselves, and of state, cannot be questioned.” Then it is their constitutional right to arm themselves. Indeed our military law, makes it the duty of every man, not exempted by law, between the ages of eighteen and forty five, to arm himself with a musket, rifle, or some firelock, with a certain quantity of [p. 485]
to themselves, But I should travel out of the line of my strict duty, as chief executive officer of the government, were I to take upon myself the task of effecting a compromise between the parties. Had I not supposed it possible, yes, probable, that I should, as executive of the state, have to act, I should before now, have interfered individually, in the way you suggest, or in some other way, in order if possible to effect a compromise. Uncommitted, as I am, to either party, I shall feel no embarrassment in doing my duty; though it may be done with the most extreme regret. My duty in the relation in which I now stand to the parties, is plain and strait forward. By an official interposition, I might embarrass my course, and urge a measure for the purpose of effecting a compromise, and , it should fail, and in the end, should I find it my duty to act contrary to the advice I had given, it might be said, that I either advised wrong: or that I was partial to one side or the other, in giving advice that I would not, as an officer, follow, A more clear, and indisputable right does not exist, that the Mormon people, who were expelled from their homes in , to return and live on their lands, and if they cannot be persuaded as a matter of policy, to give up that right, or to qualify it, my course, as the Cheif executive officer of the state is a plain one. The constitution of the , declares, “that the citizens of each state shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states.” Then we cannot interdict any people who have a political franchise in the from emigrating to this state, nor from choosing what part of the state they will settle in, provided they do not trespass on the property or rights of others. Our state constitution declares that the people’s “right to bear arms, in defence of themselves, and of state, cannot be questioned.” Then it is their constitutional right to arm themselves. Indeed our military law, makes it the duty of every man, not exempted by law, between the ages of eighteen and forty five, to arm himself with a musket, rifle, or some firelock, with a certain quantity of [p. 485]
Page 485