History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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God, and which he pretended to have some aquaintance, but with respect to the book they had [HC 1:123] presented him, he must say that he had considerable doubts. Upon which they expressed a desire to investigate the subject, and argue the matter, but he replied; No: Young gentlemen, “you must not argue with me on the subject, “but I will read your book and see what claims it has upon my faith, and will endeavour to ascertain, whether it be a revelation from God or not.
After some further conversation on the subject they expressed a desire to lay the subject before the people, and requested the privilege of preaching in Elder ’s Chapel <​to​> which he readily consented. The appointment was accordingly published and a large and respectable congregation assembled. and severally addressed the meeting. At the conclusion Elder arose and stated to the congregation, that the information they had that evening received was of an extraordinary character, and certainly demanded their most severe consideration, and as the Apostle advised his brethren “to prove all things and hold fast that which was good,” so he would exhort his brethren to do likewise and give the matter a careful investigation, and not turn against without being fully convinced of its being an imposition, lest they should possibly resist the truth.
<​see p. 74—​> This was indeed generous on the part of and gave evidence, of his entire freedom from any sectarian bias; but allowing his mind full scope to range untramelled through the scriptures, embracing every principle of truth and rejecting error under whatever guise it should appear, he was perfectly willing to allow his members the same privilege. Having received great light on the scriptures he felt desireous to receive more from whatever quarter it should come from. This was <​his previaleing​> characteristics and if any sentiment was advanced by any one, that was new or tended to throw light on the scriptures or the dealings of God with the children of men, it was allways treasured up in his mind, and gladly received it. [p. 73]
God, and which he pretended to have some aquaintance, but with respect to the book they had [HC 1:123] presented him, he must say that he had considerable doubts. Upon which they expressed a desire to investigate the subject, and argue the matter, but he replied; No: Young gentlemen, “you must not argue with me on the subject, “but I will read your book and see what claims it has upon my faith, and will endeavour to ascertain, whether it be a revelation from God or not.
After some further conversation they expressed a desire to lay the subject before the people, and requested the privilege of preaching in ’s Chapel to which he readily consented. The appointment was accordingly published and a large and respectable congregation assembled. and severally addressed the meeting. At the conclusion arose and stated to the congregation, that the information they had that evening received was of an extraordinary character, and certainly demanded their most severe consideration, and as the Apostle advised his brethren “to prove all things and hold fast that which was good,” so he would exhort his brethren to do likewise and give the matter a careful investigation, and not turn against without being fully convinced of its being an imposition, lest they should possibly resist the truth.
see p. 74— This was indeed generous on the part of and gave evidence, of his entire freedom from any sectarian bias; but allowing his mind full scope to range untramelled through the scriptures, embracing every principle of truth and rejecting error under whatever guise it should appear, he was perfectly willing to allow his members the same privilege. Having received great light on the scriptures he felt desireous to receive more from whatever quarter it should come from. This was his previaleing characteristics and if any sentiment was advanced by any one, that was new or tended to throw light on the scriptures or the dealings of God with the children of men, it was allways treasured up in his mind, and gladly received it. [p. 73]
Page 73