History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1080
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<​July 13​> honest and worthy citizens of this . 4th. Under these circumstances the first duty and the only redress which seems to offer itself to our consideration is an appeal to the of the State of for redress, and protection from further injuries, with a confident assurance that he, unlike the of , will extend the Executive arm to protect from lawless outrage, unoffending Citizens. Therefore ‘Resolved first: That we view with no ordinary feelings, the approaching danger, as a necessary consequence following the lawless and outrageous conduct of the citizens of in setting at defiance the laws of this, as well as all other states in this union by forcing from their homes, and from the , civil citizens of ; and taking them into the State of without any legal process whatever and there inflicting upon them base Cruelties in order to extort false confessions from them, to give a coloring to their (the Missourians) iniquities, and screen themselves from the just indignation of an incensed public. Resolved. secondly— That while we deeply deplore the cause which has brought us together on this occasion, we cannot refrain from expressing our most unqualified disaprobation at the infringement of the laws of this , as set forth in the above preamble, and strongest indignation, at the manner in which the people of treated those whom they had thus inhumanly taken from among us. Resolved, thirdly— that inasmuch as we are conscious of our honest and upright intentions, and are at all times ready and willing to submit to the just requirements of the laws; we claim of the citizens and authorities of this , protection from such unjust, and before, unheard of oppressions. [HC 4:158] Resolved, fourthly, that the forcible abduction of our citizens by the Citizens of , is a violation of the laws regulating the federal compact, subversive to the rights of freemen, and contrary to our free institutions and republican principles. Resolved, fifthly— that the cruelties practised upon our citizens, since their abduction, is disgraceful to humanity; the height of injustice and oppression, and would disgrace the annals of the most barbarous nations, in either ancient, or modern times; and can only find its parallel in the “Auto da Fe,” the inquisitions in Spain. Resolved, sixthly— that such unconstitutional and unhallowed proceeding on the part of the Citizens of , ought to arouse every patriot to exertion and diligence, to put a stop to such procedure; and use all constitutional means to bring the offenders to justice. Resolved, seventhly— that we memorialize the of this of the gross outrage which has been committed on our Citizens; and pledge ourselves to aid him in such measures, as may be deemed necessary to restore our citizens to freedom, and have satisfaction for the wrongs we have suffered. , Chairman. Secretary—”
“To his Excellency — The undersigned being a Committee to draft a Memorial to your relative to the recent outrages— would respectfully represent, that after being driven from our homes and pleasant places of abode in the State of by the authorities of said ; seemed to be the first Shelter or Asylum which presented itself to our view. That having left the State of , your Memorialists found an Asylum in the State of ; and notwithstanding the false reports which were circulated to our prejudice, we were received with kindness by the noble hearted Citizens of : who relieved our necessities, and bade us welcome; for which kindness we feel thankful. That under your ’s administration, we have had every encouragement given [p. 1080]
July 13 honest and worthy citizens of this . 4th. Under these circumstances the first duty and the only redress which seems to offer itself to our consideration is an appeal to the of the State of for redress, and protection from further injuries, with a confident assurance that he, unlike the of , will extend the Executive arm to protect from lawless outrage, unoffending Citizens. Therefore ‘Resolved first: That we view with no ordinary feelings, the approaching danger, as a necessary consequence following the lawless and outrageous conduct of the citizens of in setting at defiance the laws of this, as well as all other states in this union by forcing from their homes, and from the , civil citizens of ; and taking them into the State of without any legal process whatever and there inflicting upon them base Cruelties in order to extort false confessions from them, to give a coloring to their (the Missourians) iniquities, and screen themselves from the just indignation of an incensed public. Resolved. secondly— That while we deeply deplore the cause which has brought us together on this occasion, we cannot refrain from expressing our most unqualified disaprobation at the infringement of the laws of this , as set forth in the above preamble, and strongest indignation, at the manner in which the people of treated those whom they had thus inhumanly taken from among us. Resolved, thirdly— that inasmuch as we are conscious of our honest and upright intentions, and are at all times ready and willing to submit to the just requirements of the laws; we claim of the citizens and authorities of this , protection from such unjust, and before, unheard of oppressions. [HC 4:158] Resolved, fourthly, that the forcible abduction of our citizens by the Citizens of , is a violation of the laws regulating the federal compact, subversive to the rights of freemen, and contrary to our free institutions and republican principles. Resolved, fifthly— that the cruelties practised upon our citizens, since their abduction, is disgraceful to humanity; the height of injustice and oppression, and would disgrace the annals of the most barbarous nations, in either ancient, or modern times; and can only find its parallel in the “Auto da Fe,” the inquisitions in Spain. Resolved, sixthly— that such unconstitutional and unhallowed proceeding on the part of the Citizens of , ought to arouse every patriot to exertion and diligence, to put a stop to such procedure; and use all constitutional means to bring the offenders to justice. Resolved, seventhly— that we memorialize the of this of the gross outrage which has been committed on our Citizens; and pledge ourselves to aid him in such measures, as may be deemed necessary to restore our citizens to freedom, and have satisfaction for the wrongs we have suffered. , Chairman. Secretary—”
“To his Excellency — The undersigned being a Committee to draft a Memorial to your relative to the recent outrages— would respectfully represent, that after being driven from our homes and pleasant places of abode in the State of by the authorities of said ; seemed to be the first Shelter or Asylum which presented itself to our view. That having left the State of , your Memorialists found an Asylum in the State of ; and notwithstanding the false reports which were circulated to our prejudice, we were received with kindness by the noble hearted Citizens of : who relieved our necessities, and bade us welcome; for which kindness we feel thankful. That under your ’s administration, we have had every encouragement given [p. 1080]
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