History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 77
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<​June 10​> a private interview; had some conversation with in the hall in presence of several gentlemen on the 7th. inst; offered to meet him and have an interview in presence of friends, three or four to be selected by each party; which agreed to, and went to bring his friends for the interview; and the next notice he had of him was the following letter: [HC 6:436]
‘June 7th, 1844.
‘To Gen. J. Smith,
Sir; I have consulted my friends in relation to your proposals of settlement, and they as well as myself are of the opinion that your conduct and that of your unworthy, unprincipled clan is so base that it would be morally wrong, and detract from the dignity of gentlemen to hold any conference with you; the repeated insults and abuses I as well as my friends have suffered from your unlawful course towards us demands honorable resentment. We are resolved to make this our motto. nothing on our part has been done to provoke your anger, but have done all things as become men; you have trampled upon everything we hold dear and sacred; you have set all law at defiance, and profaned the name of the most high to carry out your damnable purposes; and I have nothing more to fear from you than you have already threatened, and I as well as my friends will stay here, and maintain and magnify the law as long as we stay; and we are resolved never to leave until we sell or exchange our property that we have here. The proposals made by your agent , as well as the threats you sent to intimidate me, I disdain and despise as I do their unhallowed author; the right of my family and my friends demands at my hand a refusal of all your offers. We are united in virtue and truth, and we set hell at defiance, and all her agents. Adieu.
.’
‘Gen. J. Smith.
“Mayor continued:— And when left his house, he went to a shoe shop on the hill and reported that Joseph said to him if he would come back he would give him ’s place in the church, and a hat full of specie.
sworn; said that the conversation as stated by the Mayor was correct; was at the June 7th when rode up and inquired if Gen. Smith was at home; went into the house; witness followed. was there, the General, and others, looking at some specimens of penmanship; something was said respecting a conversation at that time between the General and the . Gen. Smith observed to , if he had a conversation he would want others present. The said he would have a word with him by himself, and went into the hall. went to the door that he might see and hear what was passing. They still continued to talk on the subject of a conversation that they might have afterwards with others present, whom Mr Smith might choose. <​and might choose.​> left, and went for those that he said he wanted pres[HC 6:437]ent, and would return soon with them; thinks he heard all the conversation; heard nothing about Gen. Smiths making any offers to to settle; was present all the time. said he had seen and talked with him.
“Mayor said he wished it distinctly understood that he knew nothing about going to see .
said he sent to , and Joseph knew nothing about it.
“Councilor said came to him on the 7th inst, and said he had had an interview with , and thought he was about ready to come back, and a word from him or Joseph would bring it about.
“Mayor said the conduct of such men, and such papers, are calculated to destroy the peace of the ; and it is not safe that such things should exist, on account [p. 77]
June 10 a private interview; had some conversation with in the hall in presence of several gentlemen on the 7th. inst; offered to meet him and have an interview in presence of friends, three or four to be selected by each party; which agreed to, and went to bring his friends for the interview; and the next notice he had of him was the following letter: [HC 6:436]
‘June 7th, 1844.
‘To Gen. J. Smith,
Sir; I have consulted my friends in relation to your proposals of settlement, and they as well as myself are of the opinion that your conduct and that of your unworthy, unprincipled clan is so base that it would be morally wrong, and detract from the dignity of gentlemen to hold any conference with you; the repeated insults and abuses I as well as my friends have suffered from your unlawful course towards us demands honorable resentment. We are resolved to make this our motto. nothing on our part has been done to provoke your anger, but have done all things as become men; you have trampled upon everything we hold dear and sacred; you have set all law at defiance, and profaned the name of the most high to carry out your damnable purposes; and I have nothing more to fear from you than you have already threatened, and I as well as my friends will stay here, and maintain and magnify the law as long as we stay; and we are resolved never to leave until we sell or exchange our property that we have here. The proposals made by your agent , as well as the threats you sent to intimidate me, I disdain and despise as I do their unhallowed author; the right of my family and my friends demands at my hand a refusal of all your offers. We are united in virtue and truth, and we set hell at defiance, and all her agents. Adieu.
.’
‘Gen. J. Smith.
“Mayor continued:— And when left his house, he went to a shoe shop on the hill and reported that Joseph said to him if he would come back he would give him ’s place in the church, and a hat full of specie.
sworn; said that the conversation as stated by the Mayor was correct; was at the June 7th when rode up and inquired if Gen. Smith was at home; went into the house; witness followed. was there, the General, and others, looking at some specimens of penmanship; something was said respecting a conversation at that time between the General and the . Gen. Smith observed to , if he had a conversation he would want others present. The said he would have a word with him by himself, and went into the hall. went to the door that he might see and hear what was passing. They still continued to talk on the subject of a conversation that they might have afterwards with others present, whom Mr Smith might choose. and . left, and went for those that he said he wanted pres[HC 6:437]ent, and would return soon with them; he heard all the conversation; heard nothing about Gen. Smiths making any offers to to settle; was present all the time. said he had seen and talked with him.
“Mayor said he wished it distinctly understood that he knew nothing about going to see .
said he sent to , and Joseph knew nothing about it.
“Councilor said came to him on the 7th inst, and said he had had an interview with , and thought he was about ready to come back, and a word from him or Joseph would bring it about.
“Mayor said the conduct of such men, and such papers, are calculated to destroy the peace of the ; and it is not safe that such things should exist, on account [p. 77]
Page 77