History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 282
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<​July 24​> in , with whose aid I hope to be able to preserve order and proceed against all criminals whomsoever they may be. The following is a copy of the answer to this application:
“’Head Qrs. 3rd Mil. Dept.
Mo. July 11. 1844.
,— I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your ’s communication of this date, relating to the difficulties which have occurred between the Mormons and the people of , Illinois, and the further difficulties apprehended by you, and requesting of me a force of some five hundred men from the regular army of the , to be stationed for a time in , and to act in conjunction with such forces as may be ordered on the part of the State of . I have not the power of complying with your request, but will [HC 7:206] forward by tomorrow’s mail a copy of your communication to be laid before the authorities in , and will advise your of the result as soon as ascertained
With great respect
Your most obt Servt.
S. W. Kearny
Col. 1st Drags.’
‘His Excy
Governor of
.’
“By the above letter you will perceive that I cannot yet be enabled to say with certainty whether the application will be successful: we will know in two weeks I think, at most.
“The anti-mormon party intend to renew the war this fall, and if it were known with certainty that the troops of the regular army would be obtained to prevent their operations, they would, most likely, hasten their plans and do all the mischief in their power before the force arrives. They are not afraid of the State Militia, and would give themselves but little concern in fear of such opposition.
“I therefore caution you not to let it be known beyond your most trusted men that a regular force is expected. I have myself not informed anyone who would make the matter public, and yet most unaccountably the fact has got into the newspapers. Another caution I would give you, your people cannot pay too much attention to it. It is very natural and probable to suppose that with the prospect of such a force, and the increased security it may give, some of your people may be prompted to such audacity and imprudence as will tend to prolong angry feelings. They may thus be induced to do and say foolish and wicked things, uselessly vexatious and mortifying to the opposing party. There are no doubt wicked people in , ready for the commission of crime, as well as in every other city of the same number of inhabitants. The well disposed amongst you must restrain those persons, and if need be bring them to punishment. The public at large will not distinguish among you, but will involve you all in a common obloquy. I have dwelt more perhaps than may be agreeable to you on this point, but I have done so in my anxiety that the Mormons may demonstrate to the world that they are no more deserving than their enemies. Three or four of your people are reported to me as having already been threatening life, and publicly following men about the [p. 282]
July 24 in , with whose aid I hope to be able to preserve order and proceed against all criminals whomsoever they may be. The following is a copy of the answer to this application:
“’Head Qrs. 3rd Mil. Dept.
Mo. July 11. 1844.
,— I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your ’s communication of this date, relating to the difficulties which have occurred between the Mormons and the people of , Illinois, and the further difficulties apprehended by you, and requesting of me a force of some five hundred men from the regular army of the , to be stationed for a time in , and to act in conjunction with such forces as may be ordered on the part of the State of . I have not the power of complying with your request, but will [HC 7:206] forward by tomorrow’s mail a copy of your communication to be laid before the authorities in , and will advise your of the result as soon as ascertained
With great respect
Your most obt Servt.
S. W. Kearny
Col. 1st Drags.’
‘His Excy
Governor of
.’
“By the above letter you will perceive that I cannot yet be enabled to say with certainty whether the application will be successful: we will know in two weeks I think, at most.
“The anti-mormon party intend to renew the war this fall, and if it were known with certainty that the troops of the regular army would be obtained to prevent their operations, they would, most likely, hasten their plans and do all the mischief in their power before the force arrives. They are not afraid of the State Militia, and would give themselves but little concern in fear of such opposition.
“I therefore caution you not to let it be known beyond your most trusted men that a regular force is expected. I have myself not informed anyone who would make the matter public, and yet most unaccountably the fact has got into the newspapers. Another caution I would give you, your people cannot pay too much attention to it. It is very natural and probable to suppose that with the prospect of such a force, and the increased security it may give, some of your people may be prompted to such audacity and imprudence as will tend to prolong angry feelings. They may thus be induced to do and say foolish and wicked things, uselessly vexatious and mortifying to the opposing party. There are no doubt wicked people in , ready for the commission of crime, as well as in every other city of the same number of inhabitants. The well disposed amongst you must restrain those persons, and if need be bring them to punishment. The public at large will not distinguish among you, but will involve you all in a common obloquy. I have dwelt more perhaps than may be agreeable to you on this point, but I have done so in my anxiety that the Mormons may demonstrate to the world that they are no more deserving than their enemies. Three or four of your people are reported to me as having already been threatening life, and publicly following men about the [p. 282]
Page 282