History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 4 [addenda]
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<​June 25 26​> of this difficulty, and you are moreover represented to me as turbulent and defiant of the laws and institutions of your country.
Gen. Smith. , you Sir, as Governor of this , are aware of the prosecutions and persecutions that I have endured. You know well that our course has been peaceable and law abiding, for I have furnished this ever since our settlement here with sufficient evidence of my pacific intentions, and those of the people with whom I am associated by the endurance of every conceivable indignity and lawless outrage perpetrated upon me, and upon this people since our settlement here, and you, yourself know that I have kept you well posted in relation to all matters associated with the late difficulties; if you have not got some of my communications it has not been my fault
“Agreeably to your orders, I assembled the Nauvoo Legion for the protection of and the surrounding country against an armed band of marauders, and ever since they have been mustered I have almost daily communicated with you in regard to all the leading events that have transpired, and whether in the capacity of Mayor of the , or Lieutenant General of the Nauvoo Legion, I have striven according to the best of my judgement, to preserve the peace and administer even handed justice to all; but my motives are impugned, my acts are misconstrued, and I am grossly and wickedly misrepresented. I suppose I am indebted for my incarcertation here to the oath of a worthless man that was arraigned before me and fined for abusing and maltreating his lame, helpless brother. That I should be charged by you, , who know better, of acting contrary to law, is to me a matter of surprise. Was it the Mormons or our enemies who first commenced these difficulties? You know well it was not us, and when this turbulent, outrageous people commenced their insurretionary movements, I made you acquainted with them, officially, and asked your advice, and have followed strictly your counsel in every particular. Who ordered out the Nauvoo Legion? I did, under your direction. For what purpose? To suppress these insurrectionary movements. It was at your instance, , that I issued a proclamation calling upon the Nauvoo Legion to be in readiness, at a moment’s warning to guard against the incursions of mobs, and gave an order to , acting Major General, to that effect. Am I then to be charged for the acts of others, and because lawlessness and mobocracy abound, am I, when carrying out your instructions, to be charged with not abiding law? Why is it that I must be made accountable for other men’s acts? If there is trouble in the country neither I, nor my people made it; and all that we have ever done, after much endurance on our part, is to maintain and uphold the Constitution and institutions of our , and to protect an injured, innocent and persecuted people against misrule and mob violence.
“Concerning the destruction of the press, to which you refer, men [p. 4 [addenda]]
June 26 of this difficulty, and you are moreover represented to me as turbulent and defiant of the laws and institutions of your country.
Gen. Smith. , you Sir, as Governor of this , are aware of the prosecutions and persecutions that I have endured. You know well that our course has been peaceable and law abiding, for I have furnished this ever since our settlement here with sufficient evidence of my pacific intentions, and those of the people with whom I am associated by the endurance of every conceivable indignity and lawless outrage perpetrated upon me, and upon this people since our settlement here, and you, yourself know that I have kept you well posted in relation to all matters associated with the late difficulties; if you have not got some of my communications it has not been my fault
“Agreeably to your orders, I assembled the Nauvoo Legion for the protection of and the surrounding country against an armed band of marauders, and ever since they have been mustered I have almost daily communicated with you in regard to all the leading events that have transpired, and whether in the capacity of Mayor of the , or Lieutenant General of the Nauvoo Legion, I have striven according to the best of my judgement, to preserve the peace and administer even handed justice to all; but my motives are impugned, my acts are misconstrued, and I am grossly and wickedly misrepresented. I suppose I am indebted for my incarcertation here to the oath of a worthless man that was arraigned before me and fined for abusing and maltreating his lame, helpless brother. That I should be charged by you, , who know better, of acting contrary to law, is to me a matter of surprise. Was it the Mormons or our enemies who first commenced these difficulties? You know well it was not us, and when this turbulent, outrageous people commenced their insurretionary movements, I made you acquainted with them, officially, and asked your advice, and have followed strictly your counsel in every particular. Who ordered out the Nauvoo Legion? I did, under your direction. For what purpose? To suppress these insurrectionary movements. It was at your instance, , that I issued a proclamation calling upon the Nauvoo Legion to be in readiness, at a moment’s warning to guard against the incursions of mobs, and gave an order to , acting Major General, to that effect. Am I then to be charged for the acts of others, and because lawlessness and mobocracy abound, am I, when carrying out your instructions, to be charged with not abiding law? Why is it that I must be made accountable for other men’s acts? If there is trouble in the country neither I, nor my people made it; and all that we have ever done, after much endurance on our part, is to maintain and uphold the Constitution and institutions of our , and to protect an injured, innocent and persecuted people against misrule and mob violence.
“Concerning the destruction of the press, to which you refer, men [p. 4 [addenda]]
Page 4 [addenda]