History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 493
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speech against the Mormons, and said “the Mormons have lived long enough in ; and they must either clear out or be cleared out.” , the Moderator of the meeting, answered in a masterly manner; saying, “let us be republicans, let us honor our country and not disgrace it like . For God’s sake dont disfranchise or drive away [HC 2:97] the Mormons. They are better citizens than many of the old inhabitants.”
exclaimed, “that’s a fact, and as the Mormons have armed themselves, if they don’t fight they are cowards. I love to hear that they have brethren coming to their assistance. Greater love can no man show, than he who lays down his life for his friends brethren.”
At this critical instant, the cocking of pistols, and jingle of implements of death, denoted desperation. One motioned adjourn;” another “go on,” and in the midst of this awful crisis a person bawled into the door “A man stabbed.” The mass instantly rushed <​out​> to the spot, in hopes, as some said, that one damn’d Mormon had got killed,” but as good luck would have it, only one Missourian had dirked another; (one Calbert, a blacksmith, had stabbed one Males, who had previously whipped one Mormon nearly to death, and boasted of having whipped many more,) The wound was dangerous and as if the Lord was there, it seemed as though the occurrence was necessary to break up the meeting without further bloodshed, and give the saints a chance to consult what would be most adviseable in such a critical instant, and they immediately penned the following answer to the propositions from , presented by Owens, &c,
“Gentlemen:— Your proposition for an adjustment of the difficulties between the citizens of county and the mormons, is before us; and as explained to you in the court house this day, we are not authorized to say to you that our brethren will submit to your proposals; but we agree to spread general notice, and call a meeting of our people in all, the present week, and lay before you an answer as soon as saturday or monday next. We can say for ourselves, and in behalf of our brethren, that peace is what we desire and what we are disposed to cultivate with all men: and to effect [p. 493]
speech against the Mormons, and said “the Mormons have lived long enough in ; and they must either clear out or be cleared out.” , the Moderator of the meeting, answered in a masterly manner; saying, “let us be republicans, let us honor our country and not disgrace it like . For God’s sake dont disfranchise or drive away [HC 2:97] the Mormons. They are better citizens than many of the old inhabitants.”
exclaimed, “that’s a fact, and as the Mormons have armed themselves, if they don’t fight they are cowards. I love to hear that they have brethren coming to their assistance. Greater love can no man show, than he who lays down his life for his brethren.”
At this critical instant, the cocking of pistols, and jingle of implements of death, denoted desperation. One motioned “adjourn;” another “go on,” and in the midst of this awful crisis a person bawled into the door “A man stabbed.” The mass instantly rushed out to the spot, in hopes, as some said, that “one damn’d Mormon had got killed,” but as good luck would have it, only one Missourian had dirked another; (one Calbert, a blacksmith, had stabbed one Males, who had previously whipped one Mormon nearly to death, and boasted of having whipped many more,) The wound was dangerous and as if the Lord was there, it seemed as though the occurrence was necessary to break up the meeting without further bloodshed, and give the saints a chance to consult what would be most adviseable in such a critical instant, and they immediately penned the following answer to the propositions from , presented by Owens, &c,
“Gentlemen:— Your proposition for an adjustment of the difficulties between the citizens of and the mormons, is before us; and as explained to you in the court house this day, we are not authorized to say to you that our brethren will submit to your proposals; but we agree to spread general notice, and call a meeting of our people in all, the present week, and lay before you an answer as soon as saturday or monday next. We can say for ourselves, and in behalf of our brethren, that peace is what we desire and what we are disposed to cultivate with all men: and to effect [p. 493]
Page 493