History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 95
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<​June 13​> well as the .
“And whereas, has within the last week publicly threatened the life of one of our valued citizens— , the editor of the Signal.
“Therefore, be it solemnly Resolved, By the citizens of in Public Meeting assembled,
“That, we view the recent ordinance of the City of , and the proceedings thereunder, as an outrage, of an alarming character, revolutionary and tyrannical in its tendency, and being under color of law, as calculated to subvert and destroy in the minds of the community, all reliance on the law.
Resolved, That as a Community, we feel anxious, when possible, to redress our grievances by legal remedies; but the time has now arrived, when the law has ceased to be a protection to our lives and property; a mob at , under a city ordinance, has violated the highest privilege in our Government; and to seek redress in the ordinary mode would be utterly ineffectual.
Resolved, That the public threat made in the Council of the , not only to destroy our Printing Press, but to take the life of its , is sufficient, in connexion with the recent outrage, to command the efforts and the services of every good citizen, to put an immediate stop to the career of the mad Prophet and his demoniac coadjutors. We must not only defend ourselves from danger, but we must resolutely carry the war into the enemy’s camp. We do therefore declare, that we will [HC 6:463] sustain our Press and the , at all hazards. That we will take full vengeance,— terrible vengeance, should the lives of any of our citizens be lost in the effort. That we hold ourselves at all times in readiness to co-operate with our fellow citizens in this , and , to exterminate, utterly exterminate, the wicked and abominable Mormon Leaders, the authors of our troubles.
Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed forthwith to notify all persons in our suspected of being the tools of the Prophet, to leave immediately on pain of instant vengeance. And we do recommend the inhabitants of the adjacent Townships to do the same, hereby pledging ourselves to render all the assistance they may require.
Resolved, That the time, in our opinion has arrived, when the adherents of Smith, as a Body, should be driven from the surrounding settlements, into . That the Prophet and his miscreant adherents should then be demanded at their hands, and if not surrendered, a war of extermination should be waged, to the entire destruction, if necessary for our protection, of his adherents. And we do hereby recommend this resolution to the consideration of the several Townships, to the Mass Convention to be held at ; hereby pledging ourselves to aid, to the utmost, the complete consummation of the object in view, that we may thereby be utterly relieved of the alarm, anxiety, and trouble, to which we are now subjected.
Resolved, That every citizen arm himself to be prepared to sustain the resolutions herein contained.
“Mr. Rooselvelt rose and made a brief but eloquent speech; and called upon the citizens throughout the country to render efficient aid in carrying out the spirit of the resolutions. Mr. Roosevelt then moved a Committee of seven be appointed by the Chair to draft resolutions expressive of our action in future.
“Mr. Catlin moved to amend the motion of Mr. Roosevelt, so that the Committee should consist of one from each precinct, which motion, as amended, was adopted.
The Chair then appointed the following: Col. , Rocky Run. [p. 95]
June 13 well as the .
“And whereas, has within the last week publicly threatened the life of one of our valued citizens— , the editor of the Signal.
“Therefore, be it solemnly Resolved, By the citizens of in Public Meeting assembled,
“That, we view the recent ordinance of the City of , and the proceedings thereunder, as an outrage, of an alarming character, revolutionary and tyrannical in its tendency, and being under color of law, as calculated to subvert and destroy in the minds of the community, all reliance on the law.
Resolved, That as a Community, we feel anxious, when possible, to redress our grievances by legal remedies; but the time has now arrived, when the law has ceased to be a protection to our lives and property; a mob at , under a city ordinance, has violated the highest privilege in our Government; and to seek redress in the ordinary mode would be utterly ineffectual.
Resolved, That the public threat made in the Council of the , not only to destroy our Printing Press, but to take the life of its , is sufficient, in connexion with the recent outrage, to command the efforts and the services of every good citizen, to put an immediate stop to the career of the mad Prophet and his demoniac coadjutors. We must not only defend ourselves from danger, but we must resolutely carry the war into the enemy’s camp. We do therefore declare, that we will [HC 6:463] sustain our Press and the , at all hazards. That we will take full vengeance,— terrible vengeance, should the lives of any of our citizens be lost in the effort. That we hold ourselves at all times in readiness to co-operate with our fellow citizens in this , and , to exterminate, utterly exterminate, the wicked and abominable Mormon Leaders, the authors of our troubles.
Resolved, That a Committee of five be appointed forthwith to notify all persons in our suspected of being the tools of the Prophet, to leave immediately on pain of instant vengeance. And we do recommend the inhabitants of the adjacent Townships to do the same, hereby pledging ourselves to render all the assistance they may require.
Resolved, That the time, in our opinion has arrived, when the adherents of Smith, as a Body, should be driven from the surrounding settlements, into . That the Prophet and his miscreant adherents should then be demanded at their hands, and if not surrendered, a war of extermination should be waged, to the entire destruction, if necessary for our protection, of his adherents. And we do hereby recommend this resolution to the consideration of the several Townships, to the Mass Convention to be held at ; hereby pledging ourselves to aid, to the utmost, the complete consummation of the object in view, that we may thereby be utterly relieved of the alarm, anxiety, and trouble, to which we are now subjected.
Resolved, That every citizen arm himself to be prepared to sustain the resolutions herein contained.
“Mr. Rooselvelt rose and made a brief but eloquent speech; and called upon the citizens throughout the country to render efficient aid in carrying out the spirit of the resolutions. Mr. Roosevelt then moved a Committee of seven be appointed by the Chair to draft resolutions expressive of our action in future.
“Mr. Catlin moved to amend the motion of Mr. Roosevelt, so that the Committee should consist of one from each precinct, which motion, as amended, was adopted.
The Chair then appointed the following: Col. , Rocky Run. [p. 95]
Page 95