History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 113
image
<​June 17​> except what was said in capacity of councilors and alderman,— was by the door all the time when the press and type, and things used in connexion with the press was destroyed. There was no other property taken from the building.
“Cross examined.— Did not know the name of the man who opened the door— knew .
read the resolutions of the city council of the 10th inst., declaring the press a nuisance &c; and the Mayor’s order to the to destroy the press; and the Lieut. Generals order to , to assist the with the Legion if needed, [HC 6:490] to abate the nuisance; and the ’s return that the press and type were destroyed. (As published in the ‘Neighbor’ June 19.)
“Court queried about the destruction of the desk.
was again called up; heard tell the officers and men, to hurt no property except the press, type, and fixtures; and after the abatement enquired if his order had been obeyed, and the officers said it had.
“E. Wingott called again; heard ask for the key of the office, and afterwards saw him deliver the key to ; there was nothing destroyed but what pertained to the press.—
“Addison Everett (of ) sworn— saw the press and type taken out and burned— saw no other property burned— desk might have been taken out <​away​> before— should not have seen it if it had been; saw no desk burned,— does not believe any desk was burned.
sworn— said his docket was not burned. Witness was sure that said he had taken other papers out of the desk.
called again; saw coming from the office, and go into ’s house with books under his arm; looked like account books— saw nothing but the press and fixtures brought out except a chain, and the ordered it carried back.
“E. Wingott, recalled— stood close by the door; could see all that was done, did not believe a desk could be brought out, and he not see it.
recalled— Joseph Smith and were not on the Hill at all that evening.
was discharged by the court and sworn; asked for the key to the office— hesitated; said he wanted to get a desk that had some valuble papers in it— got the key and went in, did not see him remove the desk, might have removed it, and witness not see it; there was no desk burned.
“The Councilors submitted the case without plea; and the court discharged the prisoners.” [HC 6:491]
, , and Major John Bills started with the affidavit of Thomas G. Wilson, and my letter &c to take to . I charged , under oath, to tell every thing he knew concerning me, good or bad, as he has known me for several years; and I said to him “, you have always wished you had been with us from the commencement; if you will go to , and do this business for me now in this time of danger, it shall be as though you had been in , and had always been with us.”
made the following affidavit:—
“State of Illinois) ss.
City of )
On the 17th. day of June 1844, came , before me, , Recorder of said , and after being duly sworn, deposeth and [p. 113]
June 17 except what was said in capacity of councilors and alderman,— was by the door all the time when the press and type, and things used in connexion with the press was destroyed. There was no other property taken from the building.
“Cross examined.— Did not know the name of the man who opened the door— knew .
read the resolutions of the city council of the 10th inst., declaring the press a nuisance &c; and the Mayor’s order to the to destroy the press; and the Lieut. Generals order to , to assist the with the Legion if needed, [HC 6:490] to abate the nuisance; and the ’s return that the press and type were destroyed. (As published in the ‘Neighbor’ June 19.)
“Court queried about the destruction of the desk.
was again called up; heard tell the officers and men, to hurt no property except the press, type, and fixtures; and after the abatement enquired if his order had been obeyed, and the officers said it had.
“E. Wingott called again; heard ask for the key of the office, and afterwards saw him deliver the key to ; there was nothing destroyed but what pertained to the press.—
“Addison Everett (of ) sworn— saw the press and type taken out and burned— saw no other property burned— desk might have been taken away before— should not have seen it if it had been; saw no desk burned,— does not believe any desk was burned.
sworn— said his docket was not burned. Witness was sure that said he had taken other papers out of the desk.
called again; saw coming from the office, and go into ’s house with books under his arm; looked like account books— saw nothing but the press and fixtures brought out except a chain, and the ordered it carried back.
“E. Wingott, recalled— stood close by the door; could see all that was done, did not believe a desk could be brought out, and he not see it.
recalled— Joseph Smith and were not on the Hill at all that evening.
was discharged by the court and sworn; asked for the key to the office— hesitated; said he wanted to get a desk that had some valuble papers in it— got the key and went in, did not see him remove the desk, might have removed it, and witness not see it; there was no desk burned.
“The Councilors submitted the case without plea; and the court discharged the prisoners.” [HC 6:491]
, , and Major John Bills started with the affidavit of Thomas G. Wilson, and my letter &c to take to . I charged , under oath, to tell every thing he knew concerning me, good or bad, as he has known me for several years; and I said to him “, you have always wished you had been with us from the commencement; if you will go to , and do this business for me now in this time of danger, it shall be as though you had been in , and had always been with us.”
made the following affidavit:—
“State of Illinois) ss.
City of )
On the 17th. day of June 1844, came , before me, , Recorder of said , and after being duly sworn, deposeth and [p. 113]
Page 113