History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 190
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<​June​> is <​certainly​> a man who performed mighty wonders; he not only compelled two innocent men by virtue of his office as Governor of to go before two different magistrates on the same charge, contrary to the Constitution and laws of the to surrender themselves into the custody of a mob magistrate, (not the one who issued the writ;) go to prison under a military guard on an illegal mittimus granted contrary to law, without any examination; put in a criminal cell without having been examined for crime; brought them out of prison contrary to law; thrust them back again under the most solemn and sacred pledges of his personal faith, and the faith of the , for their protection; guarded them with men whom he knew to be treacherous; and to have resolved on the death of the prisoners, until they <​were​> murdered in cold blood, and then professed to be “thunderstruck.” It is our wish to do strict justice to the memory of this heroic governor, who in addition to the above named mighty achievements, on his death bed bequeathed to the astounded world a volume of 447 pages, entitled “History of from 1818 to 1847; containing a full account of the rise, progress and fall of Mormonism,” from which we copy the following:—
“But the great cause of popular fury was, that the Mormons at several preceding elections, had cast their vote as a unit; thereby making the fact apparent, that no one could aspire to the honors or offices of the country within the sphere of their influence, without their approbation and votes. It appears to be one of the principles by which they insist upon being governed as a community, to act as a unit in all matters of government and religion. They [HC 7:2] express themselves to be fearful that if division should be encouraged in politics, it would soon extend to their religion, and rend their church with schism and into sects.
“This seems to me to be an unfortunate view of the subject, and more unfortunate in practice, as I am well satisfied that it must be the fruitful source of excitement, violence, and mobocracy, whilst it is persisted in. It is indeed unfortunate for their peace that they do not divide in elections, according to their individual preferences or political principles, like other people.
“This one principle and practice of theirs arrayed against them in deadly hostility all aspirants for office who were not sure of their support, all who have been unsuccessful in elections, and all who were too proud to court their influence, with all their friends and connections.
“These also were the active men in blowing up the fury of the people, in hopes that a popular movement might be set on foot, which would result in the expulsion or extermination of the Mormon voters. For this purpose, public meetings had been called; inflamatory speeches had been made; exaggerated reports had been extensively circulated; committees had been appointed, who rode night and day to spread the reports, and solicit the aid of neighboring counties. And at a public meeting at , resolutions were passed to expel or exterminate the Mormon population. This was not, however, a movement which was unanimously concurred in. The contained a goodly number of inhabitants in favor of peace, or who at least desired to be neutral in such a contest. These were stigmatized by the name of ‘Jack Mormons,’ and there were not a few of the more furious exciters of the people who openly expressed their intention to involve [p. 190]
June is certainly a man who performed mighty wonders; he not only compelled two innocent men by virtue of his office as Governor of to go before two different magistrates on the same charge, contrary to the Constitution and laws of the to surrender themselves into the custody of a mob magistrate, (not the one who issued the writ;) go to prison under a military guard on an illegal mittimus granted contrary to law, without any examination; put in a criminal cell without having been examined for crime; brought them out of prison contrary to law; thrust them back again under the most solemn and sacred pledges of his personal faith, and the faith of the , for their protection; guarded them with men whom he knew to be treacherous; and to have resolved on the death of the prisoners, until they were murdered in cold blood, and then professed to be “thunderstruck.” It is our wish to do strict justice to the memory of this heroic governor, who in addition to the above named mighty achievements, on his death bed bequeathed to the astounded world a volume of 447 pages, entitled “History of from 1818 to 1847; containing a full account of the rise, progress and fall of Mormonism,” from which we copy the following:—
“But the great cause of popular fury was, that the Mormons at several preceding elections, had cast their vote as a unit; thereby making the fact apparent, that no one could aspire to the honors or offices of the country within the sphere of their influence, without their approbation and votes. It appears to be one of the principles by which they insist upon being governed as a community, to act as a unit in all matters of government and religion. They [HC 7:2] express themselves to be fearful that if division should be encouraged in politics, it would soon extend to their religion, and rend their church with schism and into sects.
“This seems to me to be an unfortunate view of the subject, and more unfortunate in practice, as I am well satisfied that it must be the fruitful source of excitement, violence, and mobocracy, whilst it is persisted in. It is indeed unfortunate for their peace that they do not divide in elections, according to their individual preferences or political principles, like other people.
“This one principle and practice of theirs arrayed against them in deadly hostility all aspirants for office who were not sure of their support, all who have been unsuccessful in elections, and all who were too proud to court their influence, with all their friends and connections.
“These also were the active men in blowing up the fury of the people, in hopes that a popular movement might be set on foot, which would result in the expulsion or extermination of the Mormon voters. For this purpose, public meetings had been called; inflamatory speeches had been made; exaggerated reports had been extensively circulated; committees had been appointed, who rode night and day to spread the reports, and solicit the aid of neighboring counties. And at a public meeting at , resolutions were passed to expel or exterminate the Mormon population. This was not, however, a movement which was unanimously concurred in. The contained a goodly number of inhabitants in favor of peace, or who at least desired to be neutral in such a contest. These were stigmatized by the name of ‘Jack Mormons,’ and there were not a few of the more furious exciters of the people who openly expressed their intention to involve [p. 190]
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