History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 919
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<April 11> and the danger that my beloved was in, I awoke and told him if he would rise very early and not wait for the Judge and Lawyers as he had contemplated, but ride briskly, he would get safe home, almost before he was aware of it, and if he did not the Mob would shoot him on the way. And tell the brethren to be of good cheer, and lose no time in removing from the Country
12 April 1839 • Friday
<12 ’s return> Friday 12 This morning arose at dawn of day, and rode rapidly towards , where he arrived before 9 a.m. The Mobbers pursued to shoot him but did not overtake him.
< letter> This day I received the following communication
“Dear Sir— Enclosed I send you the receipt which I promised, and if you will pay the necessary attention to it, and it will be a benefit to the Church and to me, and I think with a little attention on your part, they can be produced, and any person who will deliver them at any point in the , so I can get them, I will compensate them well, as I know you feel deeply interested in the welfare of the Church, and when you consider it will add to their character and look upon it in a proper light, you will spare no pains in assisting me in the recovery of those books. Yours &c in haste — To “Joseph Smith Jr. .”
, Davis County Mo. April 12. 1839. Know all Men by these presents. That I. have this day agreed with Joseph Smith Jr. to release all members of the Mormon Church from any and all debts due to me from them, for goods sold to them by me at during the year 1838 on the following condition viz that said Joseph Smith Jr. return, or cause to be [HC 3:316] returned to me the following books— One Ledger, three Day Books, and one day book of Groceries which was taken from my Store in , when said Store was burned. And if said books are returned to me within four months this shall be a receipt in full, to all intents and purposes against any debt or debts due from said Mormons to me on said books, but if not returned, this is to be null and void, Given under my hand this day and date before written— . Attest J. Lynch”—
A curious idea, that I, who had been a prisoner a many months should be called upon to hunt up lost property, or property most likely destroyed by the mob, but it is no more curious than a thousand other things that have happened, and I feel to do all I can to oblige any of my fellow creatures
. Ill. April 12, 1839. Messrs. Editors. Inclosed I send you a communication from of .— If you think the publication thereof will in any way promote the cause of justice, by the vindicating the slandered reputation of the people called “Mormons” from the ridiculous falsehoods which the malice, cupidity, and envy of their Murderers in have endeavored to heap upon them, you are respectfully solicited to publish it in the “Argus.” The testimony of , as to the good moral character of these people, I think will have its deserved influence upon the people of , in encouraging our Citizens in their humane and benevolent exertions to relieve this distressed people, who are now wandering in our neighborhoods without comfortable food, raiment or a shelter from [p. 919]
April 11 and the danger that my beloved was in, I awoke and told him if he would rise very early and not wait for the Judge and Lawyers as he had contemplated, but ride briskly, he would get safe home, almost before he was aware of it, and if he did not the Mob would shoot him on the way. And tell the brethren to be of good cheer, and lose no time in removing from the Country
12 April 1839 • Friday
12 ’s return Friday 12 This morning arose at dawn of day, and rode rapidly towards , where he arrived before 9 a.m. The Mobbers pursued to shoot him but did not overtake him.
letter This day I received the following communication
“Dear Sir— Enclosed I send you the receipt which I promised, and if you will pay the necessary attention to it, and it will be a benefit to the Church and to me, and I think with a little attention on your part, they can be produced, and any person who will deliver them at any point in the , so I can get them, I will compensate them well, as I know you feel deeply interested in the welfare of the Church, and when you consider it will add to their character and look upon it in a proper light, you will spare no pains in assisting me in the recovery of those books. Yours &c in haste — To “Joseph Smith Jr. .”
, Davis County Mo. April 12. 1839. Know all Men by these presents. That I. have this day agreed with Joseph Smith Jr. to release all members of the Mormon Church from any and all debts due to me from them, for goods sold to them by me at during the year 1838 on the following condition viz that said Joseph Smith Jr. return, or cause to be [HC 3:316] returned to me the following books— One Ledger, three Day Books, and one day book of Groceries which was taken from my Store in , when said Store was burned. And if said books are returned to me within four months this shall be a receipt in full, to all intents and purposes against any debt or debts due from said Mormons to me on said books, but if not returned, this is to be null and void, Given under my hand this day and date before written— . Attest J. Lynch”—
A curious idea, that I, who had been a prisoner a many months should be called upon to hunt up lost property, or property most likely destroyed by the mob, but it is no more curious than a thousand other things that have happened, and I feel to do all I can to oblige any of my fellow creatures
. Ill. April 12, 1839. Messrs. Editors. Inclosed I send you a communication from of .— If you think the publication thereof will in any way promote the cause of justice, by the vindicating the slandered reputation of the people called “Mormons” from the ridiculous falsehoods which the malice, cupidity, and envy of their Murderers in have endeavored to heap upon them, you are respectfully solicited to publish it in the “Argus.” The testimony of , as to the good moral character of these people, I think will have its deserved influence upon the people of , in encouraging our Citizens in their humane and benevolent exertions to relieve this distressed people, who are now wandering in our neighborhoods without comfortable food, raiment or a shelter from [p. 919]
Page 919