History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1008
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<January 3.> and my family suffered much on account of Cold and Hunger, because we  were not permitted to go outside of the Guard to obtain wood and provision  and according to orders of the Militia, in the Spring following I took my family  and left the with the loss of much property, and trouble  “Territory of Iowa ” &c subscribed and sworn before J.P.—
4 January 1840 • Saturday
4th. January 1840— Respected Sir— I had the gratification  of the receipt of yours of the 16th. December; which gave me pleasure to learn that  your prospects were at. that early period, in a measure flattering, I also saw  yours of the 19th. December to Mr. [John B.] Weber— We are now consulting and  feeling the pulsations relative to your case, being brought before the Legislature  now in Session by a series of resolutions instructing our Senators; and  requesting our representatives to urge relief in your case; what will be  done remains yet uncertain; still it is my strongest impression, it will  be found prudent to get the matter before our Legislature for their action  thereon. I am happy to learn that all our delegation are friendly  to your intended application for relief in some shape— and it strikes  <me> that the views of the at this period may be the best, and  perhaps the only way that relief could at this time be obtained; and  in that event, be no injury to a future application, to be restored to  all your rights, when prejudice shall in a measure have subsided,  and the true state of the matter be more readily received, even by those  whose prejudices, may have closed the avenues to reason and Justice  in a matter identified with the odium so commonly attached to the  sound of Mormonism. This odium will naturally wear off when  they have time to learn that Mormons are neither <Anthropophagi> or Cannibals.  Your friends are generally well. I am &c C. Adams.” “To J. Smith Jr.
The High Council at voted to utterly discard the practice  of suing Brethren at the Law, and that such as do it, shall be disfellowshiped  by this branch of the Church: That Abraham O. Smoot ordain  President of the Elders Quorum, and that the Sixth instant be devoted to  taking Affidavits concerning .
found the brethren in Albany; went to Troy, and Lansingburgh  <Vol 4 Deseret News  No. 19> where he heard Elder preach—
5 January 1840 • Sunday
<5> Sunday 5 preached at Lansingburgh, and returned to  Troy and held a meeting with the Brethren—
6 January 1840 • Monday
<6> Monday 6 returned to Albany—
Extracts from Elder ’s Letter to his January 6th.
“I am well  and hearty, after mailing the last letter to you in — I went to  on Saturday the 21st. of December, there I found President J. Smith Jr.; he  had just arrived from , where he had been about 3 weeks—  4 or 5 days after, with , came to ;  they are well. I wrote to to come and see Prest. Smith; he did so,  and probably will go to with him in a few days. I staid  with brother Smith, in , about 8 days; we then took the Railroad [p. 1008]
January 3. and my family suffered much on account of Cold and Hunger, because we were not permitted to go outside of the Guard to obtain wood and provision and according to orders of the Militia, in the Spring following I took my family and left the with the loss of much property, and trouble ” “Territory of Iowa ” &c subscribed and sworn before J.P.—
4 January 1840 • Saturday
4th. January 1840— Respected Sir— I had the gratification of the receipt of yours of the 16th. December; which gave me pleasure to learn that your prospects were at. that early period, in a measure flattering, I also saw yours of the 19th. December to Mr. [John B.] Weber— We are now consulting and feeling the pulsations relative to your case, being brought before the Legislature now in Session by a series of resolutions instructing our Senators; and requesting our representatives to urge relief in your case; what will be done remains yet uncertain; still it is my strongest impression, it will be found prudent to get the matter before our Legislature for their action thereon. I am happy to learn that all our delegation are friendly to your intended application for relief in some shape— and it strikes me that the views of the at this period may be the best, and perhaps the only way that relief could at this time be obtained; and in that event, be no injury to a future application, to be restored to all your rights, when prejudice shall in a measure have subsided, and the true state of the matter be more readily received, even by those whose prejudices, may have closed the avenues to reason and Justice in a matter identified with the odium so commonly attached to the sound of Mormonism. This odium will naturally wear off when they have time to learn that Mormons are neither Anthropophagi or Cannibals. Your friends are generally well. I am &c C. Adams.” “To J. Smith Jr.”
The High Council at voted to utterly discard the practice of suing Brethren at the Law, and that such as do it, shall be disfellowshiped by this branch of the Church: That Abraham O. Smoot ordain President of the Elders Quorum, and that the Sixth instant be devoted to taking Affidavits concerning .
found the brethren in Albany; went to Troy, and Lansingburgh Vol 4 Deseret News No. 19 where he heard Elder preach—
5 January 1840 • Sunday
5 Sunday 5 preached at Lansingburgh, and returned to Troy and held a meeting with the Brethren—
6 January 1840 • Monday
6 Monday 6 returned to Albany—
Extracts from Elder ’s Letter to his January 6th.
“I am well and hearty, after mailing the last letter to you in — I went to on Saturday the 21st. of December, there I found President J. Smith Jr.; he had just arrived from , where he had been about 3 weeks— 4 or 5 days after, with , came to ; they are well. I wrote to to come and see Prest. Smith; he did so, and probably will go to with him in a few days. I staid with brother Smith, in , about 8 days; we then took the Railroad [p. 1008]
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