History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<June 26> to Monday evening
27 June 1842 • Monday
<27> Monday 27. Transacted a variety of business— borrowed money of brothers Woolley,  Spencer &c and paid for the Mound. When the Council assembled  in the evening Brothers Hunter, Ivins, Woolley, Pierce and others being present, the  adjourned Council was postponed till Tuesday evening, and I proceeded to lecture at  length on the importance of uniting the means of the brethren for the purpose of  establishing manufactories of all kinds, furnishing labor for the poor &c Brothers  Hunter and Woolley offered their goods towards a general fund, and good feelings  were generally manifest. This morning Little told his dream  to all the house “that the Missourians had got their heads knocked off.”
28 June 1842 • Tuesday
<28> Tuesday 28. Paid brothers Woolley and Spencer Brother Hunter’s goods were  received at the , and brother Robins consecrated his goods and money to the  general fund. The adjourned Council of Sunday evening met in my Upper  Room, and were agreed that a re-inforcement go immediately to the  led by Brother Ezra Chase, and after uniting in solemn prayer to God for a  blessing on themselves and families, and the Church in General, and for the building  up of the and and : for deliverance from their enemies,  and the spread of the work of Righteousness: and that (who  was expecting to go East tomorrow for his family) — might have a  prosperous journey, have power over the winds and elements, and all opposition  and dangers, his life and health be preserved, and be speedily returned to this  place with his family, that their lives and healths might be preserved, and  that they might come up in peace to this place, and that  might be prospered according to the desire of his heart, in all things in relation  to his household, and the Church, and that the Spirit of God might rest upon  him continually, so that he may act according to the wisdom of heaven.  the Council dispersed. Previous to the Council — <I> — in  company with , visited and his family, and had  much conversation about and others. much unpleasant  feeling was manifested by ’s family, who were confounded and  put to silence by the truth.
June 28. 1842 To his Excellency of  Dear Sir. You will permit me to ask you to peruse this letter and the  accompanying Newspaper; relative to the character and conduct of  who associated himself with our religious Community near two years ago;  he being a man of respectable talents and moderately good literary attainment.  In the judicial organization of our under the Charter granted by the Legislature  of , said was elected Mayor; and continued to hold said Office  of Mayor until within the last two months or less. He having learned that  he could no longer maintain a standing as an honorable man, in our Society  he tendered his resignation which was accepted. The object of this  communication is therefore to inform you of the true character of said , that he may not injure the innocent, by gaining credence with you,  or those over whom your Excellency is placed to govern. We have learned [p. 1349]
June 26 to Monday evening
27 June 1842 • Monday
27 Monday 27. Transacted a variety of business— borrowed money of brothers Woolley, Spencer &c and paid for the Mound. When the Council assembled in the evening Brothers Hunter, Ivins, Woolley, Pierce and others being present, the adjourned Council was postponed till Tuesday evening, and I proceeded to lecture at length on the importance of uniting the means of the brethren for the purpose of establishing manufactories of all kinds, furnishing labor for the poor &c Brothers Hunter and Woolley offered their goods towards a general fund, and good feelings were generally manifest. This morning Little told his dream to all the house “that the Missourians had got their heads knocked off.”
28 June 1842 • Tuesday
28 Tuesday 28. Paid brothers Woolley and Spencer Brother Hunter’s goods were received at the , and brother Robins consecrated his goods and money to the general fund. The adjourned Council of Sunday evening met in my Upper Room, and were agreed that a re-inforcement go immediately to the led by Brother Ezra Chase, and after uniting in solemn prayer to God for a blessing on themselves and families, and the Church in General, and for the building up of the and and : for deliverance from their enemies, and the spread of the work of Righteousness: and that (who was expecting to go East tomorrow for his family) — might have a prosperous journey, have power over the winds and elements, and all opposition and dangers, his life and health be preserved, and be speedily returned to this place with his family, that their lives and healths might be preserved, and that they might come up in peace to this place, and that might be prospered according to the desire of his heart, in all things in relation to his household, and the Church, and that the Spirit of God might rest upon him continually, so that he may act according to the wisdom of heaven. the Council dispersed. Previous to the Council — I — in company with , visited and his family, and had much conversation about and others. much unpleasant feeling was manifested by ’s family, who were confounded and put to silence by the truth.
June 28. 1842 To his Excellency of Dear Sir. You will permit me to ask you to peruse this letter and the accompanying Newspaper; relative to the character and conduct of who associated himself with our religious Community near two years ago; he being a man of respectable talents and moderately good literary attainment. In the judicial organization of our under the Charter granted by the Legislature of , said was elected Mayor; and continued to hold said Office of Mayor until within the last two months or less. He having learned that he could no longer maintain a standing as an honorable man, in our Society he tendered his resignation which was accepted. The object of this communication is therefore to inform you of the true character of said , that he may not injure the innocent, by gaining credence with you, or those over whom your Excellency is placed to govern. We have learned [p. 1349]
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