History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<April 3> from , to what amount I cannot say, but he will be able to tell you when he gets home— The continues his friendship, and is ready to accommodate with money, whenever called for— Surely he is a friend in deed, and ought never to be forgotten. I am up to this time without means to get home; but I have no uneasiness about it, I shall doubtless get means as soon as my health will admit of my going— My health is slowly improving, and I think if I have no relapse, I will be able to leave for home some time in the <Vol 4 No 22> month of May—” &c— “—”
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<to come in below *> At the time of sailing & ’s health was very poor. had the ague for six days in succession, when the Ship left her moorings the shore resounded with the songs of the Saints, who had come down to Bid Them farewell; they unitedly sung “the gallant ship is under way,” until [HC 4:103] out of hearing. The brethren occupied three berths in the forecastle taking what was called a steerage passage; with the exception of , not one of them had ever been to sea, and the Sailors called them “land lubbers”. The Ship being loaded with flour & cotton, they were packed in a small compartment with about 100 or 120 passengers being a motley mixture of English, Welsh, Irish and Scotch, who were returning home from America to visit their friends, or had got sick of yankeedom and were leaving for “Sweet Home”. They had scarcely been at sea twelve hours before the whole of them were prostrated by sea sickness vomited up his ague, and has never had it since.
Brother altho’ confined to his berth by sea sickness during the entire journey, was unable to vomit. On coming into the Mersey, the Ship cast anchor in order to wait for the tide; when a small boat put off from the shore, brothers , , and went in it to the landing, on reaching the quay shouted Hosanna three times, which he had promised to do whenever he should land on the shores of Old England. The brethren then went to No. 8 Union Street , where they procured bread and wine in order to partake of the Sacrament. Elders , , and staid on board to look after the baggage.— About [HC 4:104] 3 p m sent a small boat for them, and the boatman piloted them to the same place, where they all met together, partook of the sacrament, and returned thanks for their safe deliverance.
When they landed they were almost penniless. Two or three of them had sufficient to buy hats for these who needed them the worst. <* see below.>
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6 April 1840 • Monday
<6> Monday 6 Elders , , , and landed in , on the first day of the Eleventh year of the Church, after a tedious passage of twenty eight days, Sixteen of which they encountered head winds, and one severe storm of three or four days, and a great portion of the time the decks were covered [HC 4:102] with Water, all of which tended to create sea sickness and suffering— <see above>
<* to come in from above>
“Minutes of a Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints held in , Hancock County, Illinois, on the 6th. of April A.D. 1840. At a general Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints held in Hancock County, Illinois on the sixth day of April A.D. 1840 agreeable to previous appointment— Joseph Smith Jr. was called upon to preside over the meeting, and was chosen Clerk— The Conference was then opened by prayer by Elder . The President rose and [p. 1042]
April 3 from , to what amount I cannot say, but he will be able to tell you when he gets home— The continues his friendship, and is ready to accommodate with money, whenever called for— Surely he is a friend in deed, and ought never to be forgotten. I am up to this time without means to get home; but I have no uneasiness about it, I shall doubtless get means as soon as my health will admit of my going— My health is slowly improving, and I think if I have no relapse, I will be able to leave for home some time in the Vol 4 No 22 month of May—” &c— “—”
[1 line blank]
to come in below * At the time of sailing & ’s health was very poor. had the ague for six days in succession, when the Ship left her moorings the shore resounded with the songs of the Saints, who had come down to Bid Them farewell; they unitedly sung “the gallant ship is under way,” until [HC 4:103] out of hearing. The brethren occupied three berths in the forecastle taking what was called a steerage passage; with the exception of , not one of them had ever been to sea, and the Sailors called them “land lubbers”. The Ship being loaded with flour & cotton, they were packed in a small compartment with about 100 or 120 passengers being a motley mixture of English, Welsh, Irish and Scotch, who were returning home from America to visit their friends, or had got sick of yankeedom and were leaving for “Sweet Home”. They had scarcely been at sea twelve hours before the whole of them were prostrated by sea sickness vomited up his ague, and has never had it since.
Brother altho’ confined to his berth by sea sickness during the entire journey, was unable to vomit. On coming into the Mersey, the Ship cast anchor in order to wait for the tide; when a small boat put off from the shore, brothers , , and went in it to the landing, on reaching the quay shouted Hosanna three times, which he had promised to do whenever he should land on the shores of Old England. The brethren then went to No. 8 Union Street , where they procured bread and wine in order to partake of the Sacrament. Elders , , and staid on board to look after the baggage.— About [HC 4:104] 3 p m sent a small boat for them, and the boatman piloted them to the same place, where they all met together, partook of the sacrament, and returned thanks for their safe deliverance.
When they landed they were almost penniless. Two or three of them had sufficient to buy hats for these who needed them the worst. * see below.
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6 April 1840 • Monday
6 Monday 6 Elders , , , and landed in , on the first day of the Eleventh year of the Church, after a tedious passage of twenty eight days, Sixteen of which they encountered head winds, and one severe storm of three or four days, and a great portion of the time the decks were covered [HC 4:102] with Water, all of which tended to create sea sickness and suffering— see above
* to come in from above
“Minutes of a Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints held in , Hancock County, Illinois, on the 6th. of April A.D. 1840. At a general Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints held in Hancock County, Illinois on the sixth day of April A.D. 1840 agreeable to previous appointment— Joseph Smith Jr. was called upon to preside over the meeting, and was chosen Clerk— The Conference was then opened by prayer by Elder . The President rose and [p. 1042]
Page 1042