History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<August 15> reply to my letters and attribute the delay to a press of business or  professional absence. I have come to the conclusion to join your people  immediately and take up my abode with you. Let us adopt as our Motto  Licut patribus sit Deus nobis (as God was with our fathers, so may he be  with us) and adapt the means to the end, and the victory is ours— The  winged warrior of the air will not cease to be our proud emblem of  liberty, and the dogs of war will be for ever chained. I shall be with  you in about two weeks, and shall devote my time and energies to the  advancement of the cause of truth and virtue and the advocacy of the  Holy religion which you have so nobly defended, and so honorably sustained.  My love to all the brethren, With sentiments of paternal regard, Yours  respectfully .”
-[See Margin +]-
16 August 1840 • Sunday
<+ Sunday. 16.— Joseph and met with the Saints at . They preached  on eternal judgment. -[From Uncle ’s journal]->
17 August 1840 • Monday
<17> Monday 17. Met with the High Council of at my Office, also the  High Council of . John Patten preferred many charges against . After the testimony, and the Councillors had spoken. I addressed  the Council at some length, shewing the situation of contending parties,  that there was in reality no cause of difference, that they had better be  reconciled without an action, or vote of the Council, and henceforth live  as brethren, and never more mention their former difficulties, and they  settled accordingly.
18 August 1840 • Tuesday
<18> Tuesday 18 Elders , , and , left Cheltenham  for London 110 miles, where they arrived in 7½ hours, at William Allgood’s  No. 19. King Street, Borough, and were kindly received by Mrs. Allgood,  who took them to the Kings Arms Inn.
Great distress is prevailing in Ireland: no work, and provisions very scarce.  The truth is spreading rapidly in England and Scotland.
21 August 1840 • Friday
<21> Friday— Testimony of Benjamin Boyce
“I left my home in to  go to , where I had lived the summer before, for the purpose of  meeting some debts, I fell in company with a Mr. [Alanson] Brown, who stated to me  that he was in search of some horses that had strayed from him, we had  not proceeded far together, before we were hailed by twelve armed men, who  demanded of us where we were going. I stated to them where I was going, and  likewise Mr. Brown stated his business, they then asked if we were Mormons, we  said we were, they then said that we could go no further, they said they  were sworn to kill all the damd mormons that they could find, and took us  Prisoners, tied us with ropes, and took us to a boat, and four of the Company  (one by the name of Martin, the others not known) took us to , to a  little Town called Tully, where we were put under guard, and kept till eleven  o’clock in the evening, when three men came to us with a long rope, and tied it  round each of our necks, I asked them what they were going to do with us,  one said they were going to take us to the , kill us, and make Cat fish bait  of us, his name was Uno they then led us to the Woods, I should think about  three quarters of a mile distant, they then parted us, took and stripped me  naked and tied me fast to a tree, one of the Company cocked a pistol, and [p. 1090]
August 15 reply to my letters and attribute the delay to a press of business or professional absence. I have come to the conclusion to join your people immediately and take up my abode with you. Let us adopt as our Motto Licut patribus sit Deus nobis (as God was with our fathers, so may he be with us) and adapt the means to the end, and the victory is ours— The winged warrior of the air will not cease to be our proud emblem of liberty, and the dogs of war will be for ever chained. I shall be with you in about two weeks, and shall devote my time and energies to the advancement of the cause of truth and virtue and the advocacy of the Holy religion which you have so nobly defended, and so honorably sustained. My love to all the brethren, With sentiments of paternal regard, Yours respectfully .”
-[See Margin +]-
16 August 1840 • Sunday
+ Sunday. 16.— Joseph and met with the Saints at . They preached on eternal judgment. -[From Uncle ’s journal]-
17 August 1840 • Monday
17 Monday 17. Met with the High Council of at my Office, also the High Council of . John Patten preferred many charges against . After the testimony, and the Councillors had spoken. I addressed the Council at some length, shewing the situation of contending parties, that there was in reality no cause of difference, that they had better be reconciled without an action, or vote of the Council, and henceforth live as brethren, and never more mention their former difficulties, and they settled accordingly.
18 August 1840 • Tuesday
18 Tuesday 18 Elders , , and , left Cheltenham for London 110 miles, where they arrived in 7½ hours, at William Allgood’s No. 19. King Street, Borough, and were kindly received by Mrs. Allgood, who took them to the Kings Arms Inn.
Great distress is prevailing in Ireland: no work, and provisions very scarce. The truth is spreading rapidly in England and Scotland.
21 August 1840 • Friday
21 Friday— Testimony of Benjamin Boyce
“I left my home in to go to , where I had lived the summer before, for the purpose of meeting some debts, I fell in company with a Mr. [Alanson] Brown, who stated to me that he was in search of some horses that had strayed from him, we had not proceeded far together, before we were hailed by twelve armed men, who demanded of us where we were going. I stated to them where I was going, and likewise Mr. Brown stated his business, they then asked if we were Mormons, we said we were, they then said that we could go no further, they said they were sworn to kill all the damd mormons that they could find, and took us Prisoners, tied us with ropes, and took us to a boat, and four of the Company (one by the name of Martin, the others not known) took us to , to a little Town called Tully, where we were put under guard, and kept till eleven o’clock in the evening, when three men came to us with a long rope, and tied it round each of our necks, I asked them what they were going to do with us, one said they were going to take us to the , kill us, and make Cat fish bait of us, his name was Uno they then led us to the Woods, I should think about three quarters of a mile distant, they then parted us, took and stripped me naked and tied me fast to a tree, one of the Company cocked a pistol, and [p. 1090]
Page 1090