History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<February 26> When I had returned as far as , I found the horses which we left on our journey out, and from thence I pursued my journey through Indiana on horseback, in company with , leaving at , the travelling being exceeding<ly> bad my progress was slow and wearisome—
My clerk died [HC 4:88] <on Novr. 3. 39> while I was absent— <aged 35 years; he was a man of fine education, & a faithful scribe, and Elder in the Church.>
4 March 1840 • Wednesday
<March 4> Wednesday March 4. 1840 — — — — — — — — — — — I arrived safely at after a wearisome journey, through alternate snows and mud, having witnessed many vexatious movements in Government Officers, whose sole object should be, the peace and prosperity, and happiness of the whole people, but instead of this, I discovered that popular clamor, and personal aggrandisement were the ruling principles of those in authority, and my heart faints within me, when I see by the visions of the Almighty, the end of this nation, if she continues to disregard the cries and petitions of her virtuous citizens, as she has done, and is now doing, I have also enjoyed many precious moments with the Saints during my journey. On my way home I did not fail to proclaim the iniquity and insolence of , towards myself and an injured people, which will have its effect upon the public mind; and may he never be elected again to any Office of Trust or power, by which he may abuse the innocent and let the guilty go free— I depended on to keep my daily journal during this journey, but he has failed me—
Elders and returned to , and held a conference, when many Elders were ordained. [HC 4:89]
“Twenty sixth Congress— First Session. In Senate of the March 4. 1840. Submitted, laid on the table, and ordered to be printed— Mr. [Garret] Wall made the following Report. The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the Memorial of a delegation of the Latter Day Saints, report— The petition of the memorialists sets forth, in substance, that a portion of their sect commenced a settlement in the County of , in the State of Missouri, in the summer of 1831; that they bought lands, built houses, erected Churches, and established their homes, and engaged in all the various occupations of life; that they were expelled from that in 1833 by a mob, under circumstances of great outrage, cruelty and oppression, and against all law, and without any offence committed on their part, and to the destruction of property to the amount of 120,000 dollars; that the Society thus expelled, amounted to about 1,200 souls; that no compensation was ever made for the destruction of their property in , that after their expulsion from , they settled in on the opposite side of the , where they purchased lands, and entered others at the land office, where they resided peaceably for three years, engaged in cultivation, and other useful and active employments, when the Mob again threatened their peace, lives, and property; and they became alarmed, and finally made a treaty with the Citizens of , that they should purchase their lands, and the Saints should remove, which was complied with on their part, and the Saints removed to the County of , where they took up their abode, [p. 1023]
February 26 When I had returned as far as , I found the horses which we left on our journey out, and from thence I pursued my journey through Indiana on horseback, in company with , leaving at , the travelling being exceedingly bad my progress was slow and wearisome—
My clerk died [HC 4:88] on Novr. 3. 39 while I was absent— aged 35 years; he was a man of fine education, & a faithful scribe, and Elder in the Church.
4 March 1840 • Wednesday
March 4 Wednesday March 4. 1840 — — — — — — — — — — — I arrived safely at after a wearisome journey, through alternate snows and mud, having witnessed many vexatious movements in Government Officers, whose sole object should be, the peace and prosperity, and happiness of the whole people, but instead of this, I discovered that popular clamor, and personal aggrandisement were the ruling principles of those in authority, and my heart faints within me, when I see by the visions of the Almighty, the end of this nation, if she continues to disregard the cries and petitions of her virtuous citizens, as she has done, and is now doing, I have also enjoyed many precious moments with the Saints during my journey. On my way home I did not fail to proclaim the iniquity and insolence of , towards myself and an injured people, which will have its effect upon the public mind; and may he never be elected again to any Office of Trust or power, by which he may abuse the innocent and let the guilty go free— I depended on to keep my daily journal during this journey, but he has failed me—
Elders and returned to , and held a conference, when many Elders were ordained. [HC 4:89]
“Twenty sixth Congress— First Session. In Senate of the March 4. 1840. Submitted, laid on the table, and ordered to be printed— Mr. [Garret] Wall made the following Report. The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the Memorial of a delegation of the Latter Day Saints, report— The petition of the memorialists sets forth, in substance, that a portion of their sect commenced a settlement in the County of , in the State of Missouri, in the summer of 1831; that they bought lands, built houses, erected Churches, and established their homes, and engaged in all the various occupations of life; that they were expelled from that in 1833 by a mob, under circumstances of great outrage, cruelty and oppression, and against all law, and without any offence committed on their part, and to the destruction of property to the amount of 120,000 dollars; that the Society thus expelled, amounted to about 1,200 souls; that no compensation was ever made for the destruction of their property in , that after their expulsion from , they settled in on the opposite side of the , where they purchased lands, and entered others at the land office, where they resided peaceably for three years, engaged in cultivation, and other useful and active employments, when the Mob again threatened their peace, lives, and property; and they became alarmed, and finally made a treaty with the Citizens of , that they should purchase their lands, and the Saints should remove, which was complied with on their part, and the Saints removed to the County of , where they took up their abode, [p. 1023]
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