History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 895
image
<March 9 Saints in England> would not be thus afflicted, Some were tried and tempted because took to himself a , they thought he should have given himself wholly to the ministry, and followed Paul’s advice to the letter, Some were tried because his wore a veil and others because she carried a muff to keep herself warm, when she walked out in cold weather, and even the President of the Church there thought, “she had better done without it,” she had nothing ever purchased by the Church, and to gratify their [HC 3:276] feelings wore the poorest clothes she had, and they were too good, so hard was it to buffet the storm of feeling that arose from such foolish causes— was very sick for some time, and some were dissatisfied, because he did not neglect her entirely, and go out preaching— and others that she did not go to meeting when she was not able to go so far— from such little things arose a spirit of jealousy, tattling, evil speaking, surmising, covetousness and rebellion— until the Church but too generally harbored more or less of those unpleasant feelings, and this evening Elder Halsal came out openly in Council against , and preferred some heavy charges, none of which he was able to substantiate— most of the Elders in were against for a season except , who proved himself true in the hour of trial.
10 March 1839 • Sunday
<10> Sunday 10th. When made proclamation from the pulpit that if any one had aught against him, or his Wife he wished they would come to him, and state their grievances, and if he had erred in any thing he would acknowledge his fault— one only of the brethren came to him, and that to acknowledge his own fault to in harboring unpleasant feelings without a cause, bore all these trials and persecutions with patience, for he knew the cause, his calling having been made known to him by Revelation, but he told no one of it. The work continued to spread in and vicinity, among the Staffordshire Potteries and other places in England.
15 March 1839 • Friday
<15 Petition of Joseph Smith for Habeas Corpus> Friday 15th. I made the following Petition
“To the Honorable Judge Tompkins [George Thompkins], or either of the Judges of the Supreme Court for the State of . Your petitioners , , , [HC 3:277] and Joseph Smith Junr., beg leave respectfully to represent to your honor, that Joseph Smith junr. is now unlawfully confined and restrained of his liberty, in Clay County (Missouri) that he has been restrained of his liberty near five months, your petitioners claim that the whole transaction, which has been the cause of his confinement is unlawful from the first to the last. He was taken from his house by a fraud being practised upon him by a man by the name of , and one or two others, thereby, your petitioners respectfully shew, that he was forced, contrary to his wishes, and without knowing the cause, into the camp, which was commanded by of , and from thence to sleeping on the ground, and suffering many insults and injuries, and deprivations, which were calculated in their nature to break down the Spirits and Constitution of the most robust and hardy of mankind. He was put in chains immediately on his being landed at , and there underwent a long and tedious ex parte examination. Your Petitioners shew that the said Joseph Smith Junr. was deprived of [p. 895]
March 9 Saints in England would not be thus afflicted, Some were tried and tempted because took to himself a , they thought he should have given himself wholly to the ministry, and followed Paul’s advice to the letter, Some were tried because his wore a veil and others because she carried a muff to keep herself warm, when she walked out in cold weather, and even the President of the Church there thought, “she had better done without it,” she had nothing ever purchased by the Church, and to gratify their [HC 3:276] feelings wore the poorest clothes she had, and they were too good, so hard was it to buffet the storm of feeling that arose from such foolish causes— was very sick for some time, and some were dissatisfied, because he did not neglect her entirely, and go out preaching— and others that she did not go to meeting when she was not able to go so far— from such little things arose a spirit of jealousy, tattling, evil speaking, surmising, covetousness and rebellion— until the Church but too generally harbored more or less of those unpleasant feelings, and this evening Elder Halsal came out openly in Council against , and preferred some heavy charges, none of which he was able to substantiate— most of the Elders in were against for a season except , who proved himself true in the hour of trial.
10 March 1839 • Sunday
10 Sunday 10th. When made proclamation from the pulpit that if any one had aught against him, or his Wife he wished they would come to him, and state their grievances, and if he had erred in any thing he would acknowledge his fault— one only of the brethren came to him, and that to acknowledge his own fault to in harboring unpleasant feelings without a cause, bore all these trials and persecutions with patience, for he knew the cause, his calling having been made known to him by Revelation, but he told no one of it. The work continued to spread in and vicinity, among the Staffordshire Potteries and other places in England.
15 March 1839 • Friday
15 Petition of Joseph Smith for Habeas Corpus Friday 15th. I made the following Petition
“To the Honorable Judge Tompkins [George Thompkins], or either of the Judges of the Supreme Court for the State of . Your petitioners , , , [HC 3:277] and Joseph Smith Junr., beg leave respectfully to represent to your honor, that Joseph Smith junr. is now unlawfully confined and restrained of his liberty, in Clay County (Missouri) that he has been restrained of his liberty near five months, your petitioners claim that the whole transaction, which has been the cause of his confinement is unlawful from the first to the last. He was taken from his house by a fraud being practised upon him by a man by the name of , and one or two others, thereby, your petitioners respectfully shew, that he was forced, contrary to his wishes, and without knowing the cause, into the camp, which was commanded by of , and from thence to sleeping on the ground, and suffering many insults and injuries, and deprivations, which were calculated in their nature to break down the Spirits and Constitution of the most robust and hardy of mankind. He was put in chains immediately on his being landed at , and there underwent a long and tedious ex parte examination. Your Petitioners shew that the said Joseph Smith Junr. was deprived of [p. 895]
Page 895