History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 878
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much bruised, and from that time gave up all hopes of securing any of his property
8 January 1839 • Tuesday
<January 8  Wind in England> Tuesday 8. About this time England and Ireland were visited by a tremendous  storm of Wind from the North West, which unroofed and blew down many houses  in the Cities and in the Country, doing much damage to the shipping— many  hundreds of persons were turned out of doors, and many lives lost on the land  and the Sea, and an immense amount of property destroyed— such a wind  had not been witnessed by any one living, and some began to think that the  judgments were about to follow the Elders preaching—
10 January 1839 • Thursday
<10 Resolution  of Legislature> Thursday 10.
“Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring therein  that the three resolutions of the 18th. December be referred to a joint committee  of the two houses heretofore raised on the subject of the Mormon difficulties,  with instructions to report a bill in conformity thereto, as soon as they can  conveniently prepare the same; which was agreed to.”
16 January 1839 • Wednesday
<16 Bill for  Investigation> Mr. Turner from the joint select committee introduced to the Senate “a bill  to provide for the investigation of the late disturbances in this
This Bill consists of twenty three sections
“1st. a joint committee shall be  appointed to investigate the causes of the late disturbances between the people  called Mormons, and other Inhabitants of this , and the conduct of the  military operations in repressing them: which Committee shall consist of two  Senators, to be elected by the Senate, and three Representatives, to be elected by the  House of Representatives.”
The bill further provided that the Committee should  meet at Ray County, in the first Monday in May, and thereafter  at such times and places as they should appoint; that they should choose  a Chairman, Clerk, Sergeant at Arms and Assistants; issue Subpoenas, and  other processes: administer Oaths; keep a record: furnish rooms: pay witnesses  $1.50 per day out of the Treasury, receive their pay as members of the Legislature,  Clerk four dollars per day, and one dollar and fifty cents for each arrest; in short;  all parties concerned were to be paid the highest price, and this Committee were  to be clothed with all the powers of the highest courts of Record. This bill did  not concern the Mormons as the exterminating order of , and  the action of thereon would compel all the Saints to be out of  the before the Court would sit, so that they would have no testimony but  from Mobbers, and worse Apostates— And this was evidently their object in  postponing the time so long.
About this time President proposed to  to help the Poor out of the , the replied “the poor may take care  of themselves, and I will take care of myself”— replied—  “If you will not help them out, I will.”
24 January 1839 • Thursday
<24  Joseph to the  Legislature> Thursday 24. I wrote as follows from Liberty Jail
“To the Honorable the  Legislature of — Your memorialists having a few days since,  solicited your attention to the same subject, would now respectfully  submit to your Honorable Body a few additional facts in support of  their prayer— They are now imprisoned under a charge of Treason against  the State of , and their lives, and fortunes, and characters being suspended [p. 878]
much bruised, and from that time gave up all hopes of securing any of his property
8 January 1839 • Tuesday
January 8 Wind in England Tuesday 8. About this time England and Ireland were visited by a tremendous storm of Wind from the North West, which unroofed and blew down many houses in the Cities and in the Country, doing much damage to the shipping— many hundreds of persons were turned out of doors, and many lives lost on the land and the Sea, and an immense amount of property destroyed— such a wind had not been witnessed by any one living, and some began to think that the judgments were about to follow the Elders preaching—
10 January 1839 • Thursday
10 Resolution of Legislature Thursday 10.
“Resolved by the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring therein that the three resolutions of the 18th. December be referred to a joint committee of the two houses heretofore raised on the subject of the Mormon difficulties, with instructions to report a bill in conformity thereto, as soon as they can conveniently prepare the same; which was agreed to.”
16 January 1839 • Wednesday
16 Bill for Investigation Mr. Turner from the joint select committee introduced to the Senate “a bill to provide for the investigation of the late disturbances in this
This Bill consists of twenty three sections
“1st. a joint committee shall be appointed to investigate the causes of the late disturbances between the people called Mormons, and other Inhabitants of this , and the conduct of the military operations in repressing them: which Committee shall consist of two Senators, to be elected by the Senate, and three Representatives, to be elected by the House of Representatives.”
The bill further provided that the Committee should meet at Ray County, in the first Monday in May, and thereafter at such times and places as they should appoint; that they should choose a Chairman, Clerk, Sergeant at Arms and Assistants; issue Subpoenas, and other processes: administer Oaths; keep a record: furnish rooms: pay witnesses $1.50 per day out of the Treasury, receive their pay as members of the Legislature, Clerk four dollars per day, and one dollar and fifty cents for each arrest; in short; all parties concerned were to be paid the highest price, and this Committee were to be clothed with all the powers of the highest courts of Record. This bill did not concern the Mormons as the exterminating order of , and the action of thereon would compel all the Saints to be out of the before the Court would sit, so that they would have no testimony but from Mobbers, and worse Apostates— And this was evidently their object in postponing the time so long.
About this time President proposed to to help the Poor out of the , the replied “the poor may take care of themselves, and I will take care of myself”— replied— “If you will not help them out, I will.”
24 January 1839 • Thursday
24 Joseph to the Legislature Thursday 24. I wrote as follows from Liberty Jail
“To the Honorable the Legislature of — Your memorialists having a few days since, solicited your attention to the same subject, would now respectfully submit to your Honorable Body a few additional facts in support of their prayer— They are now imprisoned under a charge of Treason against the State of , and their lives, and fortunes, and characters being suspended [p. 878]
Page 878