History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1012
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<January 7.> the months of October and November 1838 I resided in the Town of— Daviess County Missouri, and whilst being peaceably engaged in the  ordinary vocations of life, that in the early part of November my house was entered  by a body of armed men painted after the manner or custom of the Indians  of North America, and proceeded to search my house for fire arms, stating  that they understood the Mormons knew how to hide their guns, and in their  search of a bed on which lay an aged sick female who they threw to and fro  in a very rough manner without regard to humanity or decency, finding  no arms they went off without further violence— Shortly after this above described  outrage, there was a number of armed men, say about twenty— rode into  my yard and enquired for horses which they said they had lost, and  stated under confirmation of an oath that they would have the heads of  twenty Mormons, if they did not find their horses, these last were painted in  like manner as the first. These transactions took place when the  Citizens and its vicinity were engaged in a peaceable manner in the  ordinary pursuits of life. this deponent further saith. That the Mob took  possession of a Store of Dry Goods belonging to the Church of Latter Day Saints  over which they placed a guard. I went into the Store to get some articles to  distribute to the suffering poor and the officer who had the charge of the  Store, ordered me out peremptorily, stating it was too cold to wait on me,  that I must come the next morning— and returning the next morning  I found the Store almost entirely stripped of its Contents— Thereupon we as a  Church were ordered to depart the and , under the pains and penalty  of death, or a total extermination of our Society. Having no alternative, (having  my waggon stolen)— I was compelled to abandon my property except— a few—  moveables, which I got off with, in the best way that I could, and on receiving  a permit or pass which is hereto appended— I then proceeded to depart the  . “I permit to remove from to , there  remain during the winter or remove out of the unmolested— Novr. 9. 1838. Brig. Gen. By F. G. Cocknu” I accordingly left the   in the month of February following in a destitute condition—  Sworn to, before J.P.
, Lee County, Iowa Jany. 7. 1840 I do hereby certify that I  made an improvement and obtained a pre-emption right upon 160 acres of land  in Mo. in 1837— on the first of Novr. 1838 I was compelled to leave the   by order of in ten days, they took without my consent  two horses which have never been returned, nor remunerated for, also destroyed  my crop of Corn, drove off four head of Cattle.—  Sworn to before J.P.

8 January 1840 • Wednesday

<8> Wednesday 8. The High Council at voted to loan all the monies  possible for the relief of the Poor Saints.
This evening preached at <a school house in the south west part of> Richmond— <see addenda page 15>

9 January 1840 • Thursday

<9> Thursday 9. about this time I returned to where I continued to  preach and visit for a little Season— [p. 1012]
January 7. the months of October and November 1838 I resided in the Town of— Daviess County Missouri, and whilst being peaceably engaged in the ordinary vocations of life, that in the early part of November my house was entered by a body of armed men painted after the manner or custom of the Indians of North America, and proceeded to search my house for fire arms, stating that they understood the Mormons knew how to hide their guns, and in their search of a bed on which lay an aged sick female who they threw to and fro in a very rough manner without regard to humanity or decency, finding no arms they went off without further violence— Shortly after this above described outrage, there was a number of armed men, say about twenty— rode into my yard and enquired for horses which they said they had lost, and stated under confirmation of an oath that they would have the heads of twenty Mormons, if they did not find their horses, these last were painted in like manner as the first. These transactions took place when the Citizens and its vicinity were engaged in a peaceable manner in the ordinary pursuits of life. this deponent further saith. That the Mob took possession of a Store of Dry Goods belonging to the Church of Latter Day Saints over which they placed a guard. I went into the Store to get some articles to distribute to the suffering poor and the officer who had the charge of the Store, ordered me out peremptorily, stating it was too cold to wait on me, that I must come the next morning— and returning the next morning I found the Store almost entirely stripped of its Contents— Thereupon we as a Church were ordered to depart the and , under the pains and penalty of death, or a total extermination of our Society. Having no alternative, (having my waggon stolen)— I was compelled to abandon my property except— a few— moveables, which I got off with, in the best way that I could, and on receiving a permit or pass which is hereto appended— I then proceeded to depart the . “I permit to remove from to , there remain during the winter or remove out of the unmolested— Novr. 9. 1838. Brig. Gen. By F. G. Cocknu” I accordingly left the in the month of February following in a destitute condition— ” Sworn to, before J.P.
, Lee County, Iowa Jany. 7. 1840 I do hereby certify that I made an improvement and obtained a pre-emption right upon 160 acres of land in Mo. in 1837— on the first of Novr. 1838 I was compelled to leave the by order of in ten days, they took without my consent two horses which have never been returned, nor remunerated for, also destroyed my crop of Corn, drove off four head of Cattle.— ” Sworn to before J.P.

8 January 1840 • Wednesday

8 Wednesday 8. The High Council at voted to loan all the monies possible for the relief of the Poor Saints.
This evening preached at a school house in the south west part of Richmond— see addenda page 15

9 January 1840 • Thursday

9 Thursday 9. about this time I returned to where I continued to preach and visit for a little Season— [p. 1012]
Page 1012