History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1018
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<February 20> of the matter. and that the Committee should have power to send for persons, papers &c &c. In my remarks I stated that an article of the Constitution was violated in not granting compulsory process for witnesses in behalf of the prisoners— and that the main evidence adduced, upon which they were committed (as I understood) was from ; who once belonged to our society, and was compelled to swear as suited them best, in order to save his life; that I knew him to be a man, whose character was the [HC 4:82] worst, I ever knew <in> all my associations or intercourse with mankind— and that I had evidence by affidavits before them of five or six respectable men, to prove that all he swore to, was false. Brethren and Sisters I want your special prayers, that God may give me wisdom to manage this case according to his will; and that he will protect me <from> our foes, both publicly and privately— Yours in the bonds of love— —”
21 February 1840 • Friday
, Feb. 21. 1840— Dear Brother— I have just returned again from the Committee Room, and made some remarks, to which I replied— is much more mild and reasonable (mostly perhaps from Policy) than ; who related a long lingo of stuff, which he said was proven before the Legislature in , which amounted to about this, that Joseph Smith gave the Mormons liberty to trespass on their neighbor’s property; also told them, that it all belonged to them; as they were Israelites. upon the strength of this, they became the aggressors. I replied that the people in their declaration of causes that induced them to unite in order to drive the Mormons— The crime of stealing or trespassing was not mentioned; and there was no Docket; either Clerk’s or Justices that could shew it, in , , or Counties— and that no man — — — ever heard such teaching or doctrine from Joseph Smith or any other Mormon; that we held to no such doctrine neither believed in any such thing— I mentioned some things contained in our book of Doctrine and Covenants; Government and laws in General. Told them we had published long ago our belief on that subject— some things I recollected, which were, that all persons should obey the laws of the Government under which they lived, and that ecclesiastical power should not be exercised to control our civil rights in any way; particularly that ecclesiastical power should only be used in the Church; and then no further than fellowship was concerned— I think they injured their cause to day— There is another appointment for them on the morrow at 10 o’clock— Their friend they said was sick, consequently could not attend to day— said he thought it would be time enough to take it up in Congress when they could not get justice from the , and that he was confident, there was a disposition in the State of to do us justice, should we apply; That the reason of their refusing to investigate before, was, the trials of the Prisoners were pending. And further said (when speaking of the trials before ) that he understood from [HC 4:83] Gentlemen that the prisoners commended the for his clemency and fair dealing towards them; and acknowledged [p. 1018]
February 20 of the matter. and that the Committee should have power to send for persons, papers &c &c. In my remarks I stated that an article of the Constitution was violated in not granting compulsory process for witnesses in behalf of the prisoners— and that the main evidence adduced, upon which they were committed (as I understood) was from ; who once belonged to our society, and was compelled to swear as suited them best, in order to save his life; that I knew him to be a man, whose character was the [HC 4:82] worst, I ever knew in all my associations or intercourse with mankind— and that I had evidence by affidavits before them of five or six respectable men, to prove that all he swore to, was false. Brethren and Sisters I want your special prayers, that God may give me wisdom to manage this case according to his will; and that he will protect me from our foes, both publicly and privately— Yours in the bonds of love— —”
21 February 1840 • Friday
, Feb. 21. 1840— Dear Brother— I have just returned again from the Committee Room, and made some remarks, to which I replied— is much more mild and reasonable (mostly perhaps from Policy) than ; who related a long lingo of stuff, which he said was proven before the Legislature in , which amounted to about this, that Joseph Smith gave the Mormons liberty to trespass on their neighbor’s property; also told them, that it all belonged to them; as they were Israelites. upon the strength of this, they became the aggressors. I replied that the people in their declaration of causes that induced them to unite in order to drive the Mormons— The crime of stealing or trespassing was not mentioned; and there was no Docket; either Clerk’s or Justices that could shew it, in , , or Counties— and that no man — — — ever heard such teaching or doctrine from Joseph Smith or any other Mormon; that we held to no such doctrine neither believed in any such thing— I mentioned some things contained in our book of Doctrine and Covenants; Government and laws in General. Told them we had published long ago our belief on that subject— some things I recollected, which were, that all persons should obey the laws of the Government under which they lived, and that ecclesiastical power should not be exercised to control our civil rights in any way; particularly that ecclesiastical power should only be used in the Church; and then no further than fellowship was concerned— I think they injured their cause to day— There is another appointment for them on the morrow at 10 o’clock— Their friend they said was sick, consequently could not attend to day— said he thought it would be time enough to take it up in Congress when they could not get justice from the , and that he was confident, there was a disposition in the State of to do us justice, should we apply; That the reason of their refusing to investigate before, was, the trials of the Prisoners were pending. And further said (when speaking of the trials before ) that he understood from [HC 4:83] Gentlemen that the prisoners commended the for his clemency and fair dealing towards them; and acknowledged [p. 1018]
Page 1018