History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1201
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<May 4> marked respect— and while they discharge their duties with promptitude and  boldness as officers, they must not forget or neglect to observe the requisites of  gentlemen. The 2nd. Company (Light Infantry) 1st. Battalion, 1st. Regiment,  2nd. Cohort; and the 1st. Company (Lancers) 1st. Battalion, 3rd. Regiment, 2nd. Cohort  of the Legion, will act as an escort for the reception of such visiting companies from  , and , as may be present. Should the be present, it will  be announced by a fire of artillery by the 1st. Cohort, and the 2nd. companies, 1st. Battalion,  1st. Regiment, 1st. Cohort, and the 1st. Company, 1st. Battalion, 1st. Regiment, 2nd.  Cohort, when he will be received by the entire Legion with the honors due so  conspicuous a personage as the of the forces of the .  Officers receiving copies of these orders, will promulgate the same without  delay throughout the bounds of their respective commands. Joseph Smith,  Lieutenant General.”

6 May 1841 • Thursday

<6> Thursday, City of , May 6. 1841—
To the Editors of the Times and  Seasons, Gentlemen:— I wish through the medium of your paper, to  make known, that on Sunday last, I had the honor of receiving a visit  from the Hon: , Justice of the Supreme Court and Judge of  the fifth Judicial Circuit of the State of , and Esqre. of ,  who expressed great pleasure in visiting our , and were astonished at  the improvements which were made. They were officially introduced to the  congregation, who had assembled on the Meeting Ground, by the ;  and they severally addressed the assembly. , expressed his  satisfaction of what he had seen and heard respecting our people, and  took that opportunity of returning thanks to the citizens of , for  conferring upon him the freedom of the , stating that he was not  aware of rendering us any service, sufficiently important to deserve such  marked honor; and likewise spoke in high terms of our location and  the improvements we had made, and that our enterprise and industry  were highly creditable to us indeed. spoke much in favor  of the place, the industry of the Citizens, &c, and hoped they would continue  to enjoy all the blessings and privileges of our free and glorious Constitution,  and as a patriot and a freeman, he was willing at all times, to stand  boldly in defence of liberty and law. It must indeed be satisfactory to  this community to know, that kind and generous feelings exist in the hearts  of men of such high reputation and moral and intellectual worth.   has ever proved himself <friendly> to this people; and interested himself  to obtain for us our several charters, holding at that time the office of Secretary  of State. also ranks high, and has long held a standing  at the bar, which few attain, and is considered one of the most able and  profound jurists in the . The sentiments they expressed on the  occasion, were highly honorable to them as American Citizens, and as  gentlemen. How different their conduct, from that of the official  characters in the state of , whose minds were prejudiced to such  an extent, that instead of mingling in our midst and ascertaining for [p. 1201]
May 4 marked respect— and while they discharge their duties with promptitude and boldness as officers, they must not forget or neglect to observe the requisites of gentlemen. The 2nd. Company (Light Infantry) 1st. Battalion, 1st. Regiment, 2nd. Cohort; and the 1st. Company (Lancers) 1st. Battalion, 3rd. Regiment, 2nd. Cohort of the Legion, will act as an escort for the reception of such visiting companies from , and , as may be present. Should the be present, it will be announced by a fire of artillery by the 1st. Cohort, and the 2nd. companies, 1st. Battalion, 1st. Regiment, 1st. Cohort, and the 1st. Company, 1st. Battalion, 1st. Regiment, 2nd. Cohort, when he will be received by the entire Legion with the honors due so conspicuous a personage as the of the forces of the . Officers receiving copies of these orders, will promulgate the same without delay throughout the bounds of their respective commands. Joseph Smith, Lieutenant General.”

6 May 1841 • Thursday

6 Thursday, City of , May 6. 1841—
To the Editors of the Times and Seasons, Gentlemen:— I wish through the medium of your paper, to make known, that on Sunday last, I had the honor of receiving a visit from the Hon: , Justice of the Supreme Court and Judge of the fifth Judicial Circuit of the State of , and Esqre. of , who expressed great pleasure in visiting our , and were astonished at the improvements which were made. They were officially introduced to the congregation, who had assembled on the Meeting Ground, by the ; and they severally addressed the assembly. , expressed his satisfaction of what he had seen and heard respecting our people, and took that opportunity of returning thanks to the citizens of , for conferring upon him the freedom of the , stating that he was not aware of rendering us any service, sufficiently important to deserve such marked honor; and likewise spoke in high terms of our location and the improvements we had made, and that our enterprise and industry were highly creditable to us indeed. spoke much in favor of the place, the industry of the Citizens, &c, and hoped they would continue to enjoy all the blessings and privileges of our free and glorious Constitution, and as a patriot and a freeman, he was willing at all times, to stand boldly in defence of liberty and law. It must indeed be satisfactory to this community to know, that kind and generous feelings exist in the hearts of men of such high reputation and moral and intellectual worth. has ever proved himself friendly to this people; and interested himself to obtain for us our several charters, holding at that time the office of Secretary of State. also ranks high, and has long held a standing at the bar, which few attain, and is considered one of the most able and profound jurists in the . The sentiments they expressed on the occasion, were highly honorable to them as American Citizens, and as gentlemen. How different their conduct, from that of the official characters in the state of , whose minds were prejudiced to such an extent, that instead of mingling in our midst and ascertaining for [p. 1201]
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