History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<June 30> of your followers, that the manner of his death had been revealed to you— <and their exultation that it needs must be fulfilled> [HC 5:50] In reference to your request to be advised, how you should act, in case a mob should come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any course for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first law of nature, namely to defend your own rights, because were I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on, whilst those rights were violated, and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them. I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at present any real cause for the apprehension of a mob coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it— very respectfully your obt. servt. ” to Genl. Joseph Smith
<I received a letter from of which the following is a copy. See addenda book page 70 [HC 5:51] To which I wrote the following answer>
June 30. 1842— Esqre.— Dear Sir— Yours of the 27th. May has been received which I shall now briefly answer. In regard to my application for the benefit of the bankrupt act, there was no other course for me to pursue than the one I have already taken, and as I have said before all my creditors will have to fare alike. Your papers are Inventory’d along with all the other property. The influence this step may have upon our Society either commercially or religiously is a matter we cannot stop to consult, as we had no alternative left. We have been compelled to pursue this course on account of the extreme pressure of the times which continued to bear harder upon us until we took the step we have. A great pressure of business prevents my writing more at the present, you will therefore excuse a short communication— I remain yours respectfully Joseph Smith.”
1 July 1842 • Friday
<July 1> Friday July 1. 1842 Elder left for New England.
2 July 1842 • Saturday
<2> Saturday 2. Rode out in the with my Clerk, to look at some lots afterwards rode to ’s accompanied by and others.
In this day’s “Wasp” I find the following—
Sir I take the liberty to inform you that a large number of persons in different places have manifested a desire to know the Phrenological development of Joseph Smith’s head. I have examined the prophet’s head, and he is perfectly willing to have the Chart published— you will please publish in your paper such portions of it as I have marked showing the development of his much talked of brain, and let the public judge for themselves whether Phrenology proves the reports against him true or false— Time will prove all things, and a “word to the wise is sufficient” Yours respectfully A. Crane [HC 5:52]
A Phrenological Chart By A Crane M. D. Professor of Phrenology
Propensities. Amativeness— 11 L extreme susceptibility; passionately fond of the Company of the other sex. Philoprogenitiveness.— 9 L strong parental affection, great solicitude for their happiness. Inhabitiveness— 5 F attached to place of long residence; no desire to change residence.
Adhesiveness.— 8 F solicitous for the happiness of friends, and ardent attachments to the other sex.
Combativeness— 8 L indomitable perseverance; great courage; force; ability to overpower.
Destructiveness— 6 M ability to control passions; and is not disposed to extreme measures.
Secretiveness—10 L great propensity and ability to conceal feelings, plans &c.
Acquisitiveness— 9 L strong love of riches; desire to make and save money.
Alimentiveness— 9 L strong relish for food; keen and severe appetite. [p. 1352]
June 30 of your followers, that the manner of his death had been revealed to you— and their exultation that it needs must be fulfilled [HC 5:50] In reference to your request to be advised, how you should act, in case a mob should come upon you, I should feel very much at a loss to recommend any course for you to adopt, other than a resort to the first law of nature, namely to defend your own rights, because were I to advise a quiet submission on your part, I could not expect that you would fold your arms, and silently look on, whilst those rights were violated, and outraged, as long as you have the power to protect them. I however have not the most distant thought that there exists at present any real cause for the apprehension of a mob coming upon you, otherwise I should feel it my duty to endeavor to arrest it— very respectfully your obt. servt. ” to Genl. Joseph Smith
I received a letter from of which the following is a copy. See addenda book page 70 [HC 5:51] To which I wrote the following answer
June 30. 1842— Esqre.— Dear Sir— Yours of the 27th. May has been received which I shall now briefly answer. In regard to my application for the benefit of the bankrupt act, there was no other course for me to pursue than the one I have already taken, and as I have said before all my creditors will have to fare alike. Your papers are Inventory’d along with all the other property. The influence this step may have upon our Society either commercially or religiously is a matter we cannot stop to consult, as we had no alternative left. We have been compelled to pursue this course on account of the extreme pressure of the times which continued to bear harder upon us until we took the step we have. A great pressure of business prevents my writing more at the present, you will therefore excuse a short communication— I remain yours respectfully Joseph Smith.”
1 July 1842 • Friday
July 1 Friday July 1. 1842 Elder left for New England.
2 July 1842 • Saturday
2 Saturday 2. Rode out in the with my Clerk, to look at some lots afterwards rode to ’s accompanied by and others.
In this day’s “Wasp” I find the following—
Sir I take the liberty to inform you that a large number of persons in different places have manifested a desire to know the Phrenological development of Joseph Smith’s head. I have examined the prophet’s head, and he is perfectly willing to have the Chart published— you will please publish in your paper such portions of it as I have marked showing the development of his much talked of brain, and let the public judge for themselves whether Phrenology proves the reports against him true or false— Time will prove all things, and a “word to the wise is sufficient” Yours respectfully A. Crane [HC 5:52]
A Phrenological Chart By A Crane M. D. Professor of Phrenology
Propensities. Amativeness— 11 L extreme susceptibility; passionately fond of the Company of the other sex. Philoprogenitiveness.— 9 L strong parental affection, great solicitude for their happiness. Inhabitiveness— 5 F attached to place of long residence; no desire to change residence.
Adhesiveness.— 8 F solicitous for the happiness of friends, and ardent attachments to the other sex.
Combativeness— 8 L indomitable perseverance; great courage; force; ability to overpower.
Destructiveness— 6 M ability to control passions; and is not disposed to extreme measures.
Secretiveness—10 L great propensity and ability to conceal feelings, plans &c.
Acquisitiveness— 9 L strong love of riches; desire to make and save money.
Alimentiveness— 9 L strong relish for food; keen and severe appetite. [p. 1352]
Page 1352