History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1040
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<March 24> from Fair haven Connecticut) he desires to know concerning our business here, inviting us to make his house our home should we travel in that region He writes that his health is very bad— I have been talking with Mr. Steward concerning a memorial— requesting him to bring it before the house; who has promised so to do if he can; he says he will talk with some of the members respecting it— I have answered letter this day, and sent him the report of the Committee.
At this time the work of the Lord is spreading rapidly in the and England— Elders are travelling in almost every direction, and multitudes are being baptized.
1 April 1840 • Wednesday
<April 1> Wednesday April 1. 1840
“Fair Haven 1st. April 1840 Revd. Joseph Smith Junr.— My Dear Sir— After writing you at, and then going to , and not finding you, I addressed a letter to , and received a reply from , by which I first learnt of your return to — and at the same time I got the Committees report, upon your application to Congress for redress of the outrages perpetrated upon your people by the Missourians. I am not, I must confess much disappointed, in the result; as I know the vaccilating fawning character of many in both Houses of Congress; and these are not their worst traits either, for they not only lack the moral courage to do right, but will do what they — — — — — — — — — — know to be — — — — — positively wrong, if they can make political capital by it, and will abandon you, me, or any one else, with perfect indifference, and heartless treachery, if by doing it, they can obtain governmental favor, or political preferment— If we should not put our faith in Princes, it appears most emphatically true, that we should repose no confidence in politicians— The idea conveyed in the report, that exact justice will be meted to you by the judicial tribunals of , is too preposterous to require comment— It is indeed a new doctrine, that we should apply to robbers, or their supporters to condemn themselves to restore the valuables they have stolen, and to betray each other for the murders they have committed. I do not believe (though I am sorry to say it) that you will ever receive a just or honorable remuneration for your losses of property; or [HC 4:100] any reparation for the personal indignities, privations and sufferings, which your people have sustained in . The greatest reliance you have for regaining your wealth is in the honorable conduct of your people— their pure morals— their correct habits— their indefatigable industry their untiring perserverance— and their well directed enterprise— These constitute a Capital which can never be shaken by man, and form the basis of all that is great in commercial influence, or in the attainment of pecuniary power. informs me that is probably in , it would have afforded me much pleasure, to have seen you all at my house, and it was my intention to spend some time at while you were there; but my health has been so very infirm, that it has prevented [p. 1040]
March 24 ) he desires to know concerning our business here, inviting us to make his house our home should we travel in that region He writes that his health is very bad— I have been talking with Mr. Steward concerning a memorial— requesting him to bring it before the house; who has promised so to do if he can; he says he will talk with some of the members respecting it— I have answered letter this day, and sent him the report of the Committee.
At this time the work of the Lord is spreading rapidly in the and England— Elders are travelling in almost every direction, and multitudes are being baptized.
1 April 1840 • Wednesday
April 1 Wednesday April 1. 1840
“Fair Haven 1st. April 1840 Revd. Joseph Smith Junr.— My Dear Sir— After writing you at, and then going to , and not finding you, I addressed a letter to , and received a reply from , by which I first learnt of your return to — and at the same time I got the Committees report, upon your application to Congress for redress of the outrages perpetrated upon your people by the Missourians. I am not, I must confess much disappointed, in the result; as I know the vaccilating fawning character of many in both Houses of Congress; and these are not their worst traits either, for they not only lack the moral courage to do right, but will do what they — — — — — — — — — — know to be — — — — — positively wrong, if they can make political capital by it, and will abandon you, me, or any one else, with perfect indifference, and heartless treachery, if by doing it, they can obtain governmental favor, or political preferment— If we should not put our faith in Princes, it appears most emphatically true, that we should repose no confidence in politicians— The idea conveyed in the report, that exact justice will be meted to you by the judicial tribunals of , is too preposterous to require comment— It is indeed a new doctrine, that we should apply to robbers, or their supporters to condemn themselves to restore the valuables they have stolen, and to betray each other for the murders they have committed. I do not believe (though I am sorry to say it) that you will ever receive a just or honorable remuneration for your losses of property; or [HC 4:100] any reparation for the personal indignities, privations and sufferings, which your people have sustained in . The greatest reliance you have for regaining your wealth is in the honorable conduct of your people— their pure morals— their correct habits— their indefatigable industry their untiring perserverance— and their well directed enterprise— These constitute a Capital which can never be shaken by man, and form the basis of all that is great in commercial influence, or in the attainment of pecuniary power. informs me that is probably in , it would have afforded me much pleasure, to have seen you all at my house, and it was my intention to spend some time at while you were there; but my health has been so very infirm, that it has prevented [p. 1040]
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