History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 945
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<May 24> arrow points— during this journey they had slept each night on their backs, on the floor; being all four of them ironed together, with hand and ankle irons made for the purpose. This being done, the windows and doors were all fastened, and then five guards with their loaded pistols staid in the room, and one at a time sat up and watched during the night. This cruelty was inflicted on them, more to gratify a wicked disposition, than any thing else; for it was in vain for them to have tried to escape, without any irons being put on them, and had they wished to escape, they had a tolerable good opportunity at the Creek—
25 May 1839 • Saturday
<Letter to 25> Saturday—
, Hancock Co. Ill. 25th. May 1839— Dear Sir— In answer to yours of the 13th. Inst. to us, concerning [HC 3:363] the writings of Col. on the subject of our late sufferings in the State of ; we wish to say, that as to a Statement of our persecutions, being brought before the world as a political question, we entirely disapprove of it— Having however great confidence in ’s good intentions, and considering it to be the indefeisible right of every free man, to hold his own opinion in politics, as well as to religion, we will only say that we consider it to be unwise, as it is unfair, to charge any one party in politics, or any one sect of religionists with having been our oppressors, since we so well <know> that our persecutors in the State of were of every sect, and of all parties both religious and political. And as disclaims having spoken evil of any administration save that of , we presume that it need not be feared that men of sense will now suppose him wishful to implicate any other.— We consider that in making these remarks we express the sentiments of the Church in general as well as <our> own individually, and also when we say in conclusion that we feel the fullest confidence, that when the subject of our wrongs has been fully investigated by the authorities of the , we shall receive the most perfect justice at their hands; whilst our unfeeling oppressors shall be brought to condign punishment with the approbation of a free and enlightened people without respect to sect or party— We desire that you may make whatever use you may think proper of this letter, and remain your sincere friends and brethren Joseph Smith Jr., , .” Elder
This day I met the Twelve in Council. The case of Brother came up for investigation and was disposed of.
26 May 1839 • Sunday
<26> Sunday 26. I spent at home— Elders and preached.
As the Prisoners in arrived at their new house in I will give a sketch from ’s testimony.
“When we arrived within four miles of Columbia, the bridge had been destroyed from over a large and rapid [HC 3:364] river; and here we were some hours in crossing over in a totlish canoe, having to leave our carriage, together with our bedding, clothing, our trunk of clothing, books, papers, &c, but all came to us in safety after two days. After we had crossed the river, our guards having swam their horses, mounted them, and we proceeded towards Columbia, the prisoners walking on foot, being fastened together two and two by the Wrists. After walking two or three miles [p. 945]
May 24 arrow points— during this journey they had slept each night on their backs, on the floor; being all four of them ironed together, with hand and ankle irons made for the purpose. This being done, the windows and doors were all fastened, and then five guards with their loaded pistols staid in the room, and one at a time sat up and watched during the night. This cruelty was inflicted on them, more to gratify a wicked disposition, than any thing else; for it was in vain for them to have tried to escape, without any irons being put on them, and had they wished to escape, they had a tolerable good opportunity at the Creek—
25 May 1839 • Saturday
Letter to 25 Saturday—
, Hancock Co. Ill. 25th. May 1839— Dear Sir— In answer to yours of the 13th. Inst. to us, concerning [HC 3:363] the writings of Col. on the subject of our late sufferings in the State of ; we wish to say, that as to a Statement of our persecutions, being brought before the world as a political question, we entirely disapprove of it— Having however great confidence in ’s good intentions, and considering it to be the indefeisible right of every free man, to hold his own opinion in politics, as well as to religion, we will only say that we consider it to be unwise, as it is unfair, to charge any one party in politics, or any one sect of religionists with having been our oppressors, since we so well know that our persecutors in the State of were of every sect, and of all parties both religious and political. And as disclaims having spoken evil of any administration save that of , we presume that it need not be feared that men of sense will now suppose him wishful to implicate any other.— We consider that in making these remarks we express the sentiments of the Church in general as well as our own individually, and also when we say in conclusion that we feel the fullest confidence, that when the subject of our wrongs has been fully investigated by the authorities of the , we shall receive the most perfect justice at their hands; whilst our unfeeling oppressors shall be brought to condign punishment with the approbation of a free and enlightened people without respect to sect or party— We desire that you may make whatever use you may think proper of this letter, and remain your sincere friends and brethren Joseph Smith Jr., , .” Elder
This day I met the Twelve in Council. The case of Brother came up for investigation and was disposed of.
26 May 1839 • Sunday
26 Sunday 26. I spent at home— Elders and preached.
As the Prisoners in arrived at their new house in I will give a sketch from ’s testimony.
“When we arrived within four miles of Columbia, the bridge had been destroyed from over a large and rapid [HC 3:364] river; and here we were some hours in crossing over in a totlish canoe, having to leave our carriage, together with our bedding, clothing, our trunk of clothing, books, papers, &c, but all came to us in safety after two days. After we had crossed the river, our guards having swam their horses, mounted them, and we proceeded towards Columbia, the prisoners walking on foot, being fastened together two and two by the Wrists. After walking two or three miles [p. 945]
Page 945