History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 874
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<December 17  Petition presented  the Legislature> very anxious to hear from , as there were many reports in circulation,  such as “the Mormons kept up the Danite System”, “were going to build the ,”  and “more blood would be spilled, before they left the ” &c. which created a  hardness in the minds of the people— In the P.M. had an interview  with , who enquired about our people and property with as much  apparent interest as though his whole soul was engaged for our welfare, and said  he had heard that the Citizens were committing depredations on the Mormons  and driving off their Stock &c. informed him that armed forces  came in the place, and abused men women and children, stole horses, drove  off cattle, and plundered houses of every thing that pleased their fancy. said that he would write and to go to , and  put down every hostile appearance, he also stated that the Stipulations entered  into by the Mormons to leave the , and sign the deed of trust, were unconstitutional,  and not valid— replied we want the Legislature to pass a law to that  effect showing that the stipulations and deeds of trust are not valid and are  unconstitutional— and unless you do pass such a law, we shall not consider  ourselves safe in the . You say there has been a stain upon the character  of the , and now is the time to pass some law to that effect, and unless you  do, farewell to the virtue of the ; farewell to her honor and good name,  farewell to her Christian virtue, until she shall be peopled by a different race  of men; farewell to every name that binds man to man; farewell to a fine soil and  a glorious home, they are gone, they are rent from us by a lawless banditti.
18 December 1838 • Tuesday
<18  Committees Report> Tuesday 18. from the joint committee on the Mormon investigation  submitted a report, preamble and resolutions; the essential part is as follows
They consider the evidence adduced in the examination held at ,  in a great degree exparte, and not of the character which should be desired for  the basis of a fair and candid investigation— 1st. Because it is not authenticated;  and 2nd. It is confined chiefly to the object of that inquiry; namely: the investigation  of criminal charges against individuals under arrest; for these reasons, but above  all, for the reasons that it would be a direct interference with the administration  of justice, this document ought not be published, with the sanction of the Legislature.
Resolved. That it is inexpedient at this time, to prosecute further the inquiry  into the causes of the late disturbances and the conduct of the military operations  in suppressing them. Resolved that it is inexpedient to publish at this time,  any of the documents accompanying the ’s Message in relation to the  late disturbances. Resolved. that it is expedient to appoint a joint committee,  composed of [blank] Senators, and [blank] Representatives to investigate the cause of said  disturbances, and the conduct of the military operations in suppressing them, to meet  at such time, and to be invested with such powers as may be prescribed by law.”
19 December 1838 • Wednesday
<19.  Petition presented> Wednesday 19. Mr. presented the petition to the House, when it was reading,  the members were silent as the house of death, after which the debate commenced, and  excitement increased ’till the house was in an uproar, their faces turned red, their eyes  flashed fire, and their countenances spoke volumes— “Mr. Childs of said  there was not one word of truth in it, so far as he had heard, and that it ought never [p. 874]
December 17 Petition presented the Legislature very anxious to hear from , as there were many reports in circulation, such as “the Mormons kept up the Danite System”, “were going to build the ,” and “more blood would be spilled, before they left the ” &c. which created a hardness in the minds of the people— In the P.M. had an interview with , who enquired about our people and property with as much apparent interest as though his whole soul was engaged for our welfare, and said he had heard that the Citizens were committing depredations on the Mormons and driving off their Stock &c. informed him that armed forces came in the place, and abused men women and children, stole horses, drove off cattle, and plundered houses of every thing that pleased their fancy. said that he would write and to go to , and put down every hostile appearance, he also stated that the Stipulations entered into by the Mormons to leave the , and sign the deed of trust, were unconstitutional, and not valid— replied we want the Legislature to pass a law to that effect showing that the stipulations and deeds of trust are not valid and are unconstitutional— and unless you do pass such a law, we shall not consider ourselves safe in the . You say there has been a stain upon the character of the , and now is the time to pass some law to that effect, and unless you do, farewell to the virtue of the ; farewell to her honor and good name, farewell to her Christian virtue, until she shall be peopled by a different race of men; farewell to every name that binds man to man; farewell to a fine soil and a glorious home, they are gone, they are rent from us by a lawless banditti.
18 December 1838 • Tuesday
18 Committees Report Tuesday 18. from the joint committee on the Mormon investigation submitted a report, preamble and resolutions; the essential part is as follows
They consider the evidence adduced in the examination held at , in a great degree exparte, and not of the character which should be desired for the basis of a fair and candid investigation— 1st. Because it is not authenticated; and 2nd. It is confined chiefly to the object of that inquiry; namely: the investigation of criminal charges against individuals under arrest; for these reasons, but above all, for the reason that it would be a direct interference with the administration of justice, this document ought not be published, with the sanction of the Legislature.
Resolved. That it is inexpedient at this time, to prosecute further the inquiry into the causes of the late disturbances and the conduct of the military operations in suppressing them. Resolved that it is inexpedient to publish at this time, any of the documents accompanying the ’s Message in relation to the late disturbances. Resolved. that it is expedient to appoint a joint committee, composed of [blank] Senators, and [blank] Representatives to investigate the cause of said disturbances, and the conduct of the military operations in suppressing them, to meet at such time, and to be invested with such powers as may be prescribed by law.”
19 December 1838 • Wednesday
19. Petition presented Wednesday 19. Mr. presented the petition to the House, when it was reading, the members were silent as the house of death, after which the debate commenced, and excitement increased ’till the house was in an uproar, their faces turned red, their eyes flashed fire, and their countenances spoke volumes— “Mr. Childs of said there was not one word of truth in it, so far as he had heard, and that it ought never [p. 874]
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