History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<April 6> myself and fellow prisoners off to , under a guard of about  ten men commanded by Samuel Tillery, Deputy Jailor of . We  were promised that we should go through , which was directly on our  route, which our friends at that place knew, and were expecting us, but  instead of fulfilling their promise, they took us round the and out of  the direct course Eighteen miles, far from habitations, where every opportunity  presented for a general massacre.
<Committee> This evening the Committee met in Council, prayer by .  The business of the Council being the order of the Leaders of the Mob  delivered this day to the Saints in this to leave before Friday next  Resolved to hire all the Teams, that can be hired, to move the families  of the Saints out of the to Tenny’s Grove— Resolved to send   immediately to for assistance from the Saints  there in teams &c— The mission of Elders and to   was deferred for the present.—

7 April 1839 • Sunday

<7> Sunday April 7 the Committee met in Council at ’s  Brother made a report if his visit to the Judges at  Jefferson— A letter from the Prisoners at was read and  Daniel Shearer and were appointed to see Mr. Hughes  and get him to go to , and tend the Sittings of the Court there—
We continued our travels across the Prairie, while the Brethren  at anxious for our welfare, gave a man Thirty dollars to  convey a letter to us at , and return an answer—

8 April 1839 • Monday

<8> Monday 8. After a tedious journey, for our long confinement had  enfeebled our bodily powers, we arrived in , about a Mile  <Arrival at > from — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — where we  were delivered into the hands of William Morgan, Sheriff of  with his guard, William Bowman, John Brassfield, and John Pogue— The   Guard returned immediately, but became divided, or got lost on  their way, and a part of them arrived in after dark, and got caught  in the fence, and calling for help— went to their assistance  and took them to the tavern, from them he got a letter I had written the  Committee, informing them of our arrival at

9 April 1839 • Tuesday

<9 Trial at > Tuesday 9. Our trial commenced before a drunken grand jury. presiding Judge as drunk as the Jury, for they were all drunk together.  Elder had been despatched by the Committee to visit us.  <and bring a hundred dollars that was sent by , as we were destitute of means at that time—>  and leaving this morning, and swimming several <streams> he arrived  among us in the afternoon, and spent the evening in our Company— brought a written copy of a Statute, which had passed the Legislature  giving us the privilege if a change of venue on our own affidavit—  arrived from Mill Port, and was favorable to our escape, from the persecution we  were enduring, and spent the evening with us <in> prison, and we had as pleasant  a time as such circumstances would permit, for we were as happy as the happiest  the Spirit buoyed us above our trials, and we rejoiced in each others Society. [p. 914]
April 6 myself and fellow prisoners off to , under a guard of about ten men commanded by Samuel Tillery, Deputy Jailor of . We were promised that we should go through , which was directly on our route, which our friends at that place knew, and were expecting us, but instead of fulfilling their promise, they took us round the and out of the direct course Eighteen miles, far from habitations, where every opportunity presented for a general massacre.
Committee This evening the Committee met in Council, prayer by . The business of the Council being the order of the Leaders of the Mob delivered this day to the Saints in this to leave before Friday next Resolved to hire all the Teams, that can be hired, to move the families of the Saints out of the to Tenny’s Grove— Resolved to send immediately to for assistance from the Saints there in teams &c— The mission of Elders and to was deferred for the present.—

7 April 1839 • Sunday

7 Sunday April 7 the Committee met in Council at ’s Brother made a report if his visit to the Judges at Jefferson— A letter from the Prisoners at was read and Daniel Shearer and were appointed to see Mr. Hughes and get him to go to , and tend the Sittings of the Court there—
We continued our travels across the Prairie, while the Brethren at anxious for our welfare, gave a man Thirty dollars to convey a letter to us at , and return an answer—

8 April 1839 • Monday

8 Monday 8. After a tedious journey, for our long confinement had enfeebled our bodily powers, we arrived in , about a Mile Arrival at from — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — where we were delivered into the hands of William Morgan, Sheriff of with his guard, William Bowman, John Brassfield, and John Pogue— The Guard returned immediately, but became divided, or got lost on their way, and a part of them arrived in after dark, and got caught in the fence, and calling for help— went to their assistance and took them to the tavern, from them he got a letter I had written the Committee, informing them of our arrival at

9 April 1839 • Tuesday

9 Trial at Tuesday 9. Our trial commenced before a drunken grand jury. presiding Judge as drunk as the Jury, for they were all drunk together. Elder had been despatched by the Committee to visit us. and bring a hundred dollars that was sent by , as we were destitute of means at that time— and leaving this morning, and swimming several streams he arrived among us in the afternoon, and spent the evening in our Company— brought a written copy of a Statute, which had passed the Legislature giving us the privilege if a change of venue on our own affidavit— arrived from Mill Port, and was favorable to our escape, from the persecution we were enduring, and spent the evening with us in prison, and we had as pleasant a time as such circumstances would permit, for we were as happy as the happiest the Spirit buoyed us above our trials, and we rejoiced in each others Society. [p. 914]
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