History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1041
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<April 1> me from executing nearly all the arrangements, I had proposed for myself for the last eight months. Knowing the additions constantly joining your Society, it has occurred to me, that some of them may be unprovided with farming lands; and I mention at this time, that I am interested in a Tract of about 12,000 acres of very choice lands consisting of Timber and Prairie, fifteen or twenty miles from , upon which Mr. Gillet and several other families are settled, and cultivating most excellent farms— it is one of the best Neighborhoods in the . I do not know what my Copartners in this tract would say about disposing of what remains unsold of the Tract (say eight to nine thousand acres) but I should be disposed to sell upon reasonable terms, provided from twenty to forty families, valuable for their prudence, industry, and good habits from your Society, can be found to form a small Colony of practical farmers— I am also interested with the same Gentleman in lands near Rock River, in Henry and Mercer Counties, and believe this would on many accounts be another extremely desirable place or location for a Colony of your people— I have said nothing to those owning with me relative to this subject, but suppose they would be governed materially by two considerations; namely, the characters of the purchasers and the fact of their being actual settlers or not— If you think two small colonies of the right sort can be formed from your Society, you will oblige, by informing me at your earliest opportunity— The price of the balance in the Tract near , including an average proportion of timber, and an average proportion of prairie, I should think 450/100 dollars per acre, none of the prairie alone has been sold less than 3 dollars, and some at 3 and a half, and I am confident that four and a half dollars for timber and prairie is very low, and especially as a credit except for a small amount would be extended to the purchasers— The other Tract is nearly all Prairie, but the finest selection of that region. It is probably worth three and a half dollars per acre. [HC 4:101] As my paper is out I have only room to request my respects presented to all friends at . I beg you to tell the Editor of the Times and Seasons that as soon as my health allows me to go to the bank, I shall send them $10. Your obt. servt.
3 April 1840 • Friday
<3> Friday April 3rd. 1840
“<at> , <>. Brother J. Smith Jr. Dear Sir— I thought I would occupy a portion of this morning in writing to you— by a letter received from yesterday, I have learned that the Senate has decided that they have no constitutional right to interfere in the case between us, and the people of ; and refer us to the Courts for redress; either those of , or the . Now I am confident, that there is but one person in , that we can sue with safety, and that is , and he is known to be a bankrupt, and unable to pay his debts, that if we should sue him, we will have the cost to pay, as he has nothing to pay it, with, We are therefore left to bear the loss without redress at present— is on the way home, and has been for ten days, he obtained money [p. 1041]
April 1 me from executing nearly all the arrangements, I had proposed for myself for the last eight months. Knowing the additions constantly joining your Society, it has occurred to me, that some of them may be unprovided with farming lands; and I mention at this time, that I am interested in a Tract of about 12,000 acres of very choice lands consisting of Timber and Prairie, fifteen or twenty miles from , upon which Mr. Gillet and several other families are settled, and cultivating most excellent farms— it is one of the best Neighborhoods in the . I do not know what my Copartners in this tract would say about disposing of what remains unsold of the Tract (say eight to nine thousand acres) but I should be disposed to sell upon reasonable terms, provided from twenty to forty families, valuable for their prudence, industry, and good habits from your Society, can be found to form a small Colony of practical farmers— I am also interested with the same Gentleman in lands near Rock River, in Henry and Mercer Counties, and believe this would on many accounts be another extremely desirable place or location for a Colony of your people— I have said nothing to those owning with me relative to this subject, but suppose they would be governed materially by two considerations; namely, the characters of the purchasers and the fact of their being actual settlers or not— If you think two small colonies of the right sort can be formed from your Society, you will oblige, by informing me at your earliest opportunity— The price of the balance in the Tract near , including an average proportion of timber, and an average proportion of prairie, I should think 450/100 dollars per acre, none of the prairie alone has been sold less than 3 dollars, and some at 3 and a half, and I am confident that four and a half dollars for timber and prairie is very low, and especially as a credit except for a small amount would be extended to the purchasers— The other Tract is nearly all Prairie, but the finest selection of that region. It is probably worth three and a half dollars per acre. [HC 4:101] As my paper is out I have only room to request my respects presented to all friends at . I beg you to tell the Editor of the Times and Seasons that as soon as my health allows me to go to the bank, I shall send them $10. Your obt. servt.
3 April 1840 • Friday
3 Friday April 3rd. 1840
“at , . Brother J. Smith Jr. Dear Sir— I thought I would occupy a portion of this morning in writing to you— by a letter received from yesterday, I have learned that the Senate has decided that they have no constitutional right to interfere in the case between us, and the people of ; and refer us to the Courts for redress; either those of , or the . Now I am confident, that there is but one person in , that we can sue with safety, and that is , and he is known to be a bankrupt, and unable to pay his debts, that if we should sue him, we will have the cost to pay, as he has nothing to pay it, with, We are therefore left to bear the loss without redress at present— is on the way home, and has been for ten days, he obtained money [p. 1041]
Page 1041