History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1036
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<March 19> at out under the ’s order, or were they Mobbers? A Mobbers, are Captain and his company out by legal authority or are they Mobbers? A. Mobbers. Where are those Mobbers now? A. They have joined the Army. This Company at the Surrender of were painted like Indians. The army wore a badge of red (Blood!!) I saw a large amount of timber and lumber destroyed, and used for fuel by the Soldiers, the destruction of Cattle, Hogs, &c seemed to be their Sport, as their Camp and the fields testified when they withdrew. An excellent Gun was taken from me, which I have never seen or heard of since. A [HC 4:70] Gun that was left in my care was taken at the same time, which I afterwards found with Wiley E. Williams of (reputed one of the ’s aides) to obtain which I had to prove property— affirm before a Magistrate— and pay said Williams fifty cents!! I was called to extract lead, dress the wounds &c for several persons (<Saints>) who were shot in the above siege, two of whom died— Immediately previous to the above transactions and for a long time before, the Citizens of , and particularly , were called upon to watch for Mobs by day, and guard against them by night, till it became a burden almost intolerable— Sworn to, before C. M. Woods Clerk— Circuit Court— Illinois—
20 March 1840 • Friday
<20> “I Gibson Gates do hereby certify that I was residing in Missouri, in the fall of the year of 1833 and had been for the space of about one year, I was at a meeting one day for worship, when a man by the name of Masters came to us stating that he was sent by the Mob to inform us that if we would forsake our religion, they were willing to be our brethren, and to fight for us; But if not, said he, our young men are ready, and we can scarce constrain them from falling upon you, and cutting you to pieces; soon after this, there came a large company of men, armed, to my place, and with much threatning, and profane words ordered me to be gone by the next day, or they would kill me and my family, in consequence of which threatning we quit our house in the month of November, leaving most of our effects, suffering very much with cold, fatigue, and hunger, we took on the Prairie and went southward twenty miles or more, where we stayed a few weeks. But still being threatened by the Mob, we removed to , where we lived in peace until the fall of 1838, when a mob arose against the people of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, when we were again obliged to leave our home, seek safety in another place for a few welks [weeks], when we returned our house had been broken upon, and the lock of a trunk broken open and the most valuable contents thereof taken away, the most of our bedding and furniture was either stolen or destroyed and <we were> then ordered to leave the — Gibson Gates” Sworn to, before J.P.
21 March 1840 • Saturday
<21> “This is to certify that I was a Citizen of Missouri, and owned a good farm, laying on the Blue River six miles west of , and lived in peace with the Inhabitants until the [p. 1036]
March 19 at out under the ’s order, or were they Mobbers? A Mobbers, are Captain and his company out by legal authority or are they Mobbers? A. Mobbers. Where are those Mobbers now? A. They have joined the Army. This Company at the Surrender of were painted like Indians. The army wore a badge of red (Blood!!) I saw a large amount of timber and lumber destroyed, and used for fuel by the Soldiers, the destruction of Cattle, Hogs, &c seemed to be their Sport, as their Camp and the fields testified when they withdrew. An excellent Gun was taken from me, which I have never seen or heard of since. A [HC 4:70] Gun that was left in my care was taken at the same time, which I afterwards found with Wiley E. Williams of (reputed one of the ’s aides) to obtain which I had to prove property— affirm before a Magistrate— and pay said Williams fifty cents!! I was called to extract lead, dress the wounds &c for several persons (Saints) who were shot in the above siege, two of whom died— Immediately previous to the above transactions and for a long time before, the Citizens of , and particularly , were called upon to watch for Mobs by day, and guard against them by night, till it became a burden almost intolerable— ” Sworn to, before C. M. Woods Clerk— Circuit Court— Illinois—
20 March 1840 • Friday
20 “I Gibson Gates do hereby certify that I was residing in Missouri, in the fall of the year of 1833 and had been for the space of about one year, I was at a meeting one day for worship, when a man by the name of Masters came to us stating that he was sent by the Mob to inform us that if we would forsake our religion, they were willing to be our brethren, and to fight for us; But if not, said he, our young men are ready, and we can scarce constrain them from falling upon you, and cutting you to pieces; soon after this, there came a large company of men, armed, to my place, and with much threatning, and profane words ordered me to be gone by the next day, or they would kill me and my family, in consequence of which threatning we quit our house in the month of November, leaving most of our effects, suffering very much with cold, fatigue, and hunger, we took on the Prairie and went southward twenty miles or more, where we stayed a few weeks. But still being threatened by the Mob, we removed to , where we lived in peace until the fall of 1838, when a mob arose against the people of the Church of the Latter Day Saints, when we were again obliged to leave our home, seek safety in another place for a few welks [weeks], when we returned our house had been broken upon, and the lock of a trunk broken open and the most valuable contents thereof taken away, the most of our bedding and furniture was either stolen or destroyed and we were then ordered to leave the — Gibson Gates” Sworn to, before J.P.
21 March 1840 • Saturday
21 “This is to certify that I was a Citizen of Missouri, and owned a good farm, laying on the Blue River six miles west of , and lived in peace with the Inhabitants until the [p. 1036]
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