History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 856
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<November 6> The Prisoners at were started off for under a strong guard—

7 November 1838 • Wednesday

<7 to > Wednesday 7. The following order was issued at by
“Brig. Gen.   will take up the line of March with his Brigade on this morning, for , in Daviess County, and take possession of the Prisoners at that place, and  proceed to ascertain those who committed crimes, and when done to put them under close  guard, and when he moves, take them to Keytesville, after leaving them recognized by  the proper authority”

8 November 1838 • Thursday

<8 at > Thursday 8. There was a severe snow storm yesterday and to day—  arrived at , he placed guards around the Town, so that no person  might pass out or in without permission. All the men in Town were then taken  and put under guard, and a court of inquiry was instituted, with  on the bench; the said belonged to the Mob and was one of the  leaders of it from the time mobbing first commenced in  The attorney belonged to ’s army.
Shortly after our arrival in , Colonel from the army  of , came with orders from , who was commander in Chief of  the expedition, to have us forwarded <forth>with to — Accordingly on Thursday  <started for > morning we started with three guards only, and they had been obtained with great  difficulty, after laboring all the previous day to get them. Between  and Roy’s ferry, on the , they all got drunk, and we got possession  of their arms and horses. It was late in the afternoon, near the setting of the Sun.  We travelled about half a mile after we crossed the , and put up for the night.

9 November 1838 • Friday

<9> Friday 9th. This morning there came a number of men, some of them armed, their  threatenings and savage appearance were such as to make us afraid to proceed  without more guards. A messenger was therefore dispatched to to  obtain them. We started before their arrival, but had not gone far before we met   with a guard of about seventy four men, and were conducted by them  to and put into an old vacant house, and a guard set. Sometime  < came> through the course of that day, came in and we were introduced  to him— We enquired of him the reason why we had been thus carried from  our homes and what were the charges against us. He said that he was not  then able to determine, but would be in a short time, and with very little more  conversation withdrew. Some short time after he had withdrawn, came  <Brought chains and Padlocks> in with two chains in his hands, and a number of padlocks. The two chains  he fastened together. He had with him ten men armed, who stood at the time of  these operations with a thumb upon the cock of their guns. They first nailed down the  windows, then came and ordered a man by the name of John Fulkerson whom he had  with him, to chain us together with chains and padlocks, being seven in number.
After that, he searched us, examining our pockets to see if we had any arms; finding nothing  but pocket knives, he took them and conveyed them off.

10 November 1838 • Saturday

<[David] Holman’s Permit 10.> Saturday 10. “I permit David Holman to remove from to there  to remain during the winter or to pass out of the — Brig. Gen. by F. G. Cockner  Aid— Novr. 10th. 1838—” [p. 856]
November 6 The Prisoners at were started off for under a strong guard—

7 November 1838 • Wednesday

7 to Wednesday 7. The following order was issued at by
“Brig. Gen. will take up the line of March with his Brigade on this morning, for , in Daviess County, and take possession of the Prisoners at that place, and proceed to ascertain those who committed crimes, and when done to put them under close guard, and when he moves, take them to Keytesville, after leaving them recognized by the proper authority”

8 November 1838 • Thursday

8 at Thursday 8. There was a severe snow storm yesterday and to day— arrived at , he placed guards around the Town, so that no person might pass out or in without permission. All the men in Town were then taken and put under guard, and a court of inquiry was instituted, with on the bench; the said belonged to the Mob and was one of the leaders of it from the time mobbing first commenced in — The attorney belonged to ’s army.
Shortly after our arrival in , Colonel from the army of , came with orders from , who was commander in Chief of the expedition, to have us forwarded forthwith to — Accordingly on Thursday started for morning we started with three guards only, and they had been obtained with great difficulty, after laboring all the previous day to get them. Between and Roy’s ferry, on the , they all got drunk, and we got possession of their arms and horses. It was late in the afternoon, near the setting of the Sun. We travelled about half a mile after we crossed the , and put up for the night.

9 November 1838 • Friday

9 Friday 9th. This morning there came a number of men, some of them armed, their threatenings and savage appearance were such as to make us afraid to proceed without more guards. A messenger was therefore dispatched to to obtain them. We started before their arrival, but had not gone far before we met with a guard of about seventy four men, and were conducted by them to and put into an old vacant house, and a guard set. Sometime came through the course of that day, came in and we were introduced to him— We enquired of him the reason why we had been thus carried from our homes and what were the charges against us. He said that he was not then able to determine, but would be in a short time, and with very little more conversation withdrew. Some short time after he had withdrawn, came Brought chains and Padlocks in with two chains in his hands, and a number of padlocks. The two chains he fastened together. He had with him ten men armed, who stood at the time of these operations with a thumb upon the cock of their guns. They first nailed down the windows, then came and ordered a man by the name of John Fulkerson whom he had with him, to chain us together with chains and padlocks, being seven in number.
After that, he searched us, examining our pockets to see if we had any arms; finding nothing but pocket knives, he took them and conveyed them off.

10 November 1838 • Saturday

David Holman’s Permit 10. Saturday 10. “I permit David Holman to remove from to there to remain during the winter or to pass out of the — Brig. Gen. by F. G. Cockner Aid— Novr. 10th. 1838—” [p. 856]
Page 856