History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1016
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<February 6> who treated me very insolently, and it was with great reluctance he listened to our message, which when he had heard, he said “Gentlemen, your cause is just, but I can do nothing for you,” and “If I take up for you, I shall lose the Vote of ,” His whole course went to shew that he was an office seeker, that self aggrandisement was his ruling passion, and that justice and righteousness were no part of his composition. I found him such a man as I could not conscientiously support at the head of our noble republic— I also had an interview with Mr. whose conduct towards me very ill became his station. I became satisfied there was little use for me to tarry, to press the just claims of the Saints on the protection of the or Congress, and staid but a few days, taking passage in Company with and on the Railroads, and in Stages back to , Ohio.
7 February 1840 • Friday
<7> Friday 7. High Council at voted to disfellowship all brethren who should persist in keeping tipling shops in that branch of the Church.
16 February 1840 • Sunday
<16> Sunday 16 tarried at ’s <58 Mott St. > and arrived there this morning—
20 February 1840 • Thursday
<20> Thursday 20. I left at , and he wrote me as follows. [HC 4:80]
February 20. 1840— Dear Brother— I have just returned from the Committee Room, wherein I spoke about one hour and a half, there were but three of the Committee present, for which I am very sorry— I think they will be obliged to acknowledge the justice of our cause. They paid good attention; and I think <my remarks> were well received— It was a special meeting appointed to hear me by my request. The Senators and Representatives were invited to attend, and attended, and God gave me courage, so that I was not intimidated by them, , I thought felt a little uneasy at times; but manifested a much better Spirit afterwards than ; I told them firstly that I represented a suffering people who had been deprived, together with myself of their rights in ; who numbered something like fifteen thousand souls; and not only they, but many others were deprived of the rights guaranteed to <them> by the Constitution of the ; at least the amount of one hundred and fifty thousand free born Citizens are deprived the enjoyment of Citizenship, in each or, every State, that we had no ingress in the State of ; nor could any of us have only at the expence of our lives, and this by the order of the , I then took their own declaration of the cause of our expulsion: referred them to s Pamphlet, which I held in my hand, then shewed that the first accusation, therein contained, was on account of our religious tenets, furthermore that the others were utterly groundless: I went on to prove that the whole persecution from beginning to end was grounded on our religious faith— For evidence of this I referred them to ’s testimony and P. Powells; I stated that there was abundant testimony to prove this to be a fact among the documents I then gave a brief history of the persecutions from the first settlement in the to our final expulsion— I also stated that the Society were industrious [p. 1016]
February 6 who treated me very insolently, and it was with great reluctance he listened to our message, which when he had heard, he said “Gentlemen, your cause is just, but I can do nothing for you,” and “If I take up for you, I shall lose the Vote of ,” His whole course went to shew that he was an office seeker, that self aggrandisement was his ruling passion, and that justice and righteousness were no part of his composition. I found him such a man as I could not conscientiously support at the head of our noble republic— I also had an interview with Mr. whose conduct towards me very ill became his station. I became satisfied there was little use for me to tarry, to press the just claims of the Saints on the protection of the or Congress, and staid but a few days, taking passage in Company with and on the Railroads, and in Stages back to , Ohio.
7 February 1840 • Friday
7 Friday 7. High Council at voted to disfellowship all brethren who should persist in keeping tipling shops in that branch of the Church.
16 February 1840 • Sunday
16 Sunday 16 tarried at ’s 58 Mott St. and arrived there this morning—
20 February 1840 • Thursday
20 Thursday 20. I left at , and he wrote me as follows. [HC 4:80]
February 20. 1840— Dear Brother— I have just returned from the Committee Room, wherein I spoke about one hour and a half, there were but three of the Committee present, for which I am very sorry— I think they will be obliged to acknowledge the justice of our cause. They paid good attention; and I think my remarks were well received— It was a special meeting appointed to hear me by my request. The Senators and Representatives were invited to attend, and attended, and God gave me courage, so that I was not intimidated by them, , I thought felt a little uneasy at times; but manifested a much better Spirit afterwards than ; I told them firstly that I represented a suffering people who had been deprived, together with myself of their rights in ; who numbered something like fifteen thousand souls; and not only they, but many others were deprived of the rights guaranteed to them by the Constitution of the ; at least the amount of one hundred and fifty thousand free born Citizens are deprived the enjoyment of Citizenship, in each or, every State, that we had no ingress in the State of ; nor could any of us have only at the expence of our lives, and this by the order of the , I then took their own declaration of the cause of our expulsion: referred them to s Pamphlet, which I held in my hand, then shewed that the first accusation, therein contained, was on account of our religious tenets, furthermore that the others were utterly groundless: I went on to prove that the whole persecution from beginning to end was grounded on our religious faith— For evidence of this I referred them to ’s testimony and P. Powells; I stated that there was abundant testimony to prove this to be a fact among the documents I then gave a brief history of the persecutions from the first settlement in the to our final expulsion— I also stated that the Society were industrious [p. 1016]
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