History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<May 6> themselves our character, kept entirely aloof, but were ready at all times  to listen to those who had the “poison of adders under their tongues,” and  who sought our overthrow— Let every person who may have imbibed  sentiments prejudicial to us, imitate the honorable example of our  distinguished visitors ( and ) and I believe they will find  much less to condemn than they anticipated, and probably a great deal  to commend— What makes the late visit more pleasing, is the fact,  that Messrs. and , have long been held in high estimation as  politicians, being champions of the two great parties that exist in the ;  but laying aside all party strife, like brothers, citizens and friends, they  mingle with us, mutually disposed to extend to us <that> courtesy, respect, and  friendship, which I hope we shall ever be proud to reciprocate— I am,  very respectfully, yours &c Joseph Smith.”
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8 May 1841 • Saturday

<8> Saturday 8. Brother is preaching in
Accounts of the progress of the Gospel  from the Elders abroad are very encouraging.
<A magazine of 300 barrels of gunpowder at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina exploded, blowing the Fort, seven other buildings and forty persons to atoms.>

12 May 1841 • Wednesday

<12> <Wednesday 12. The Rochester with the Elders, came in sight of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia.>

15 May 1841 • Saturday

<15> Good news has recently reached us from Tennessee, , & .
<The Elders are baptizing in all directions.>

16 May 1841 • Sunday

<16> Sunday 16. I addressed the Saints— The following <is a sketch> of my Sermon  by the Editor <of the Times and Seasons>,
“At 10 o clock A.M. a large concourse of the Saints assembled on the  Meeting Ground, and were addressed by President Joseph Smith, who spoke at  considerable length. He commenced his observations by remarking that  the kindness of our heavenly Father, called for our heartfelt gratitude. He  <*> then observed that Satan was generally blamed for the evils which we did,  but if he was the cause of all our wickedness, men could not be condemned.  The devil cannot compel mankind to <do> evil, all was voluntary. Those who  resist the Spirit of God, are liable to be led into temptation, and then the  association of heaven is withdrawn from those who refuse to be made partakers  of such great glory — God would not exert any compulsory means, and the  Devil could not; and such ideas as were entertained by many, were absurd.  The creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but Christ subjected the  same in hope— we are all subject to vanity while we travel through the crooked  paths, and difficulties which surround us. Where is the man that is free from  vanity? None ever were perfect but Jesus, and why was he perfect? because he  was the Son of God, and had the fulness of the Spirit, and greater power than any  Man. But, notwithstanding our vanity, we look forward with hope, (because “we  are subjected in hope,”) to the time of our deliverance. He then made some  observations on the first principles of the gospel, observing that many of the Saints  who had come from different states and nations had only a very superficial  knowledge of these principles, not having heard them fully investigated. He then  briefly stated the principles of faith, repentance and baptism for the remission  of sins, which were believed by some of the religious societies of the day, but the  doctrine of laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, was discarded by them.  The speaker then referred to the 6th. chap. of Hebrews 1 and 2 verses, “not [p. 1202]
May 6 themselves our character, kept entirely aloof, but were ready at all times to listen to those who had the “poison of adders under their tongues,” and who sought our overthrow— Let every person who may have imbibed sentiments prejudicial to us, imitate the honorable example of our distinguished visitors ( and ) and I believe they will find much less to condemn than they anticipated, and probably a great deal to commend— What makes the late visit more pleasing, is the fact, that Messrs. and , have long been held in high estimation as politicians, being champions of the two great parties that exist in the ; but laying aside all party strife, like brothers, citizens and friends, they mingle with us, mutually disposed to extend to us that courtesy, respect, and friendship, which I hope we shall ever be proud to reciprocate— I am, very respectfully, yours &c Joseph Smith.”
[1 line blank]

8 May 1841 • Saturday

8 Saturday 8. Brother is preaching in
Accounts of the progress of the Gospel from the Elders abroad are very encouraging.
A magazine of 300 barrels of gunpowder at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina exploded, blowing the Fort, seven other buildings and forty persons to atoms.

12 May 1841 • Wednesday

12 Wednesday 12. The Rochester with the Elders, came in sight of Cape Sable, Nova Scotia.

15 May 1841 • Saturday

15 Good news has recently reached us from Tennessee, , & .
The Elders are baptizing in all directions.

16 May 1841 • Sunday

16 Sunday 16. I addressed the Saints— The following is a sketch of my Sermon by the Editor of the Times and Seasons,
“At 10 o clock A.M. a large concourse of the Saints assembled on the Meeting Ground, and were addressed by President Joseph Smith, who spoke at considerable length. He commenced his observations by remarking that the kindness of our heavenly Father, called for our heartfelt gratitude. He * then observed that Satan was generally blamed for the evils which we did, but if he was the cause of all our wickedness, men could not be condemned. The devil cannot compel mankind to do evil, all was voluntary. Those who resist the Spirit of God, are liable to be led into temptation, and then the association of heaven is withdrawn from those who refuse to be made partakers of such great glory — God would not exert any compulsory means, and the Devil could not; and such ideas as were entertained by many, were absurd. The creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but Christ subjected the same in hope— we are all subject to vanity while we travel through the crooked paths, and difficulties which surround us. Where is the man that is free from vanity? None ever were perfect but Jesus, and why was he perfect? because he was the Son of God, and had the fulness of the Spirit, and greater power than any Man. But, notwithstanding our vanity, we look forward with hope, (because “we are subjected in hope,”) to the time of our deliverance. He then made some observations on the first principles of the gospel, observing that many of the Saints who had come from different states and nations had only a very superficial knowledge of these principles, not having heard them fully investigated. He then briefly stated the principles of faith, repentance and baptism for the remission of sins, which were believed by some of the religious societies of the day, but the doctrine of laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost, was discarded by them. The speaker then referred to the 6th. chap. of Hebrews 1 and 2 verses, “not [p. 1202]
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