History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 21 [addenda]
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<September 14th 1840> with his brother 2400 miles in , , , and  New Hampshire, visiting the branches of the church in those States and bestowing  patriarchal blessings on several hundred persons, preaching the gospel to all who  would hear, and baptizing many. They arrived at on the 2nd of  Octr 1836. During the persecution in in 1837 he was made a prisoner  but fortunately obtained his liberty, and after a very tedious journey in the spring  and summer of 1838 he arrived at , Missouri. After I and my brother   were thrown into the Jails by the Mob he fled from under the  exterminating order of Governor and made his escape in  midwinter to Illinois from whence he removed to in the  Spring of 1839. The exposures he suffered brought on consumption of which he  died on this fourteenth day of September 1840 aged 69 years 2 months and 2 days
He was 6 feet 2 inches high, was very straight and remarkably well proportioned  his ordinary weight was about 200 lbs, and he was very strong and active. In  his young days he was famed as a wrestler, and Jacob like, he never wrestled with  but one man, whom he could not throw. He was one of the most benevolent  of men, opening his house to all who were destitute. While at , Illinois  he fed hundreds of the poor saints who were flying from the persecutions  although he had arrived there penniless himself. See page 1094. [1 line blank]
Addenda • 3 February 1841, first of two entries
City of , Hancock Co. Ills February 2nd. 1841 To the County Recorder of the County of .  Dear Sir At a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at this place, on Saturday the 30th day of  January A.D. 1841 I was elected sole Trustee for said Church, to hold my office during life (my Successors to be the first Presidency of  said Church) and vested with Plenary Powers, as sole Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to receive,  acquire, manage, or convey property, real personal or mixed, for the sole use and benefit of said Church, agreeably to the (see continuation page 24)
Addenda • April 1841
The following is copied from the Millenial Star of April 1841:
Difference between  <this copied in Addenda book page 20 to 24> the Baptists and Latter-Day Saints. From the “North Staffordshire Mercury.”  Sir,— In a late publication, you reported the case of some persons who were  taken before T. B. Rose, Esqre. for disturbing a congregation of “Latter- Day Saints”, or believers in the “Book of Mormon”. A teacher of that  sect, on being asked by the Magistrate wherein they differed from the  Baptists, replied, “in the laying on of hands;” but declined making an  honest confession of those pecularities which separate them as widely from  the Baptists as from every other denomination of the christian church.  This was certainly prudent; but as the Baptists feel themselves dis honoured by such an alliance, they would be unjust to themselves  were they to leave unanswered such a libel upon their denomination.  The following very prominent marks of difference will enable  your readers to judge for themselves.
1.— The Saints admit all persons indiscriminately to baptism,  encouraging them to pass through that rite, with the promise that  great spiritual improvement will follow. They baptize for  remission of sins, without waiting for credible evidence of repentance  for sin. But the Baptists admit none to that ordinance who [p. 21 [addenda]]
September 14th 1840 with his brother 2400 miles in , , , and New Hampshire, visiting the branches of the church in those States and bestowing patriarchal blessings on several hundred persons, preaching the gospel to all who would hear, and baptizing many. They arrived at on the 2nd of Octr 1836. During the persecution in in 1837 he was made a prisoner but fortunately obtained his liberty, and after a very tedious journey in the spring and summer of 1838 he arrived at , Missouri. After I and my brother were thrown into the Jails by the Mob he fled from under the exterminating order of Governor and made his escape in midwinter to Illinois from whence he removed to in the Spring of 1839. The exposures he suffered brought on consumption of which he died on this fourteenth day of September 1840 aged 69 years 2 months and 2 days
He was 6 feet 2 inches high, was very straight and remarkably well proportioned his ordinary weight was about 200 lbs, and he was very strong and active. In his young days he was famed as a wrestler, and Jacob like, he never wrestled with but one man, whom he could not throw. He was one of the most benevolent of men, opening his house to all who were destitute. While at , Illinois he fed hundreds of the poor saints who were flying from the persecutions although he had arrived there penniless himself. See page 1094. [1 line blank]
Addenda • 3 February 1841, first of two entries
City of , Hancock Co. Ills February 2nd. 1841 To the County Recorder of the County of . Dear Sir At a meeting of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, at this place, on Saturday the 30th day of January A.D. 1841 I was elected sole Trustee for said Church, to hold my office during life (my Successors to be the first Presidency of said Church) and vested with Plenary Powers, as sole Trustee in Trust for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, to receive, acquire, manage, or convey property, real personal or mixed, for the sole use and benefit of said Church, agreeably to the (see continuation page 24)
Addenda • April 1841
The following is copied from the Millenial Star of April 1841:
Difference between this copied in Addenda book page 20 to 24 the Baptists and Latter-Day Saints. From the “North Staffordshire Mercury.” Sir,— In a late publication, you reported the case of some persons who were taken before T. B. Rose, Esqre. for disturbing a congregation of “Latter-Day Saints”, or believers in the “Book of Mormon”. A teacher of that sect, on being asked by the Magistrate wherein they differed from the Baptists, replied, “in the laying on of hands;” but declined making an honest confession of those pecularities which separate them as widely from the Baptists as from every other denomination of the christian church. This was certainly prudent; but as the Baptists feel themselves dishonoured by such an alliance, they would be unjust to themselves were they to leave unanswered such a libel upon their denomination. The following very prominent marks of difference will enable your readers to judge for themselves.
1.— The Saints admit all persons indiscriminately to baptism, encouraging them to pass through that rite, with the promise that great spiritual improvement will follow. They baptize for remission of sins, without waiting for credible evidence of repentance for sin. But the Baptists admit none to that ordinance who [p. 21 [addenda]]
Page 21 [addenda]