History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1081
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<July> us, and have every reason from the kindness and sympathy which you have ever manifested towards us in our sufferings, to feel confident that your aid will ever be offered to us in common with the rest of the Citizens of the — That feeling ourselves so happy and secure, and beginning again to enjoy the Comforts of life— We are sorry to say that our quiet has been disturbed— our fears alarmed, and our families annoyed by the Citizens of ; who, with malice and hatred, which is characteristic of them, have unconstitutionally sent an armed force, and abducted some of our friends. viz. James Allred, [HC 4:159] Noah Rodgers [Rogers], Alanson Brown, and one Boice [Benjamin Boyce], and carried them into the State of , and treated them with the greatest barbarity and cruelty; even now their Wives and Children as well as their friends are alarmed for the safety of their lives. — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — Therefore we have felt it our duty to place the circumstances of this unheard of outrage before you, and appeal to your for protection from such marauders, and take such measures as you — — — — — — — may deem proper that our friends may be again restored to the bosom of their families and the offenders punished for their crimes. We have the greatest confidence in your , that every Constitutional means will be resorted <to,> to restore our friends to the Society of their families &c. that we in Common with other Citizens of the State of , may enjoy all the rights and privileges of freemen. Your Memorialists have under all Circumstances paid the greatest respect to the laws of the , and if any should break the same, they have never felt a disposition to screen such from justice, but when under false pretences, to gratify and satiate a revengeful disposition; for the Citizens of another State, regardless of both the laws of God and Man, to come and kidnap our friends, to carry off our Citizens, to cruelly treat our brethren; Such offenders we think should be brought to an account, to be dealt with according to their merit or demerit; that we may enjoy the privileges guaranteed to us by the Constitution of the . We therefore humbly pray that your will satisfy yourself of the gross outrage which has been committed on the Citizens of this , and with that energy which is so characteristic of your ’s administration, take such steps as you may deem best calculated to repair the injuries which your Memorialists have sustained— that you will vindicate the injured laws of the . In conclusion we beg leave to assure your , that in the discharge of this, as well as every other Constitutional movement you may rely upon the hearty co-operation of your Memorialists. — — — — — — — — — — — — — who respectfully submit to your the accompanying Resolutions, which were passed at a large meeting held in this place on this day, and also the Affidavit of one of those persons who was kidnapped, but fortunately has made his escape” [HC 4:160]
15 July 1840 • Wednesday
<15> Extract <of a letter> from Elder William Barratt dated “Deptford July 15. 1840” on his way to <South> Australia
“Dear Brother in Christ, I write to inform you of my arrival in the metropolis this morning, after a tedious journey, in the midst of much profaneness and swearing, such as I never heard in my life before. I feel, as the Apostle expresses it, like a lamb among wolves, going into a land of strangers to preach the Gospel; therefore I desire your prayers in my behalf. I have witnessed much of the Spirit of Revelation since Sunday; in fact, I only thought it a mere thought, when the Elders testified that they were called by Revelation; but now I know [p. 1081]
July us, and have every reason from the kindness and sympathy which you have ever manifested towards us in our sufferings, to feel confident that your aid will ever be offered to us in common with the rest of the Citizens of the — That feeling ourselves so happy and secure, and beginning again to enjoy the Comforts of life— We are sorry to say that our quiet has been disturbed— our fears alarmed, and our families annoyed by the Citizens of ; who, with malice and hatred, which is characteristic of them, have unconstitutionally sent an armed force, and abducted some of our friends. viz. James Allred, [HC 4:159] Noah Rodgers [Rogers], Alanson Brown, and one Boice [Benjamin Boyce], and carried them into the State of , and treated them with the greatest barbarity and cruelty; even now their Wives and Children as well as their friends are alarmed for the safety of their lives. — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — Therefore we have felt it our duty to place the circumstances of this unheard of outrage before you, and appeal to your for protection from such marauders, and take such measures as you — — — — — — — may deem proper that our friends may be again restored to the bosom of their families and the offenders punished for their crimes. We have the greatest confidence in your , that every Constitutional means will be resorted to, to restore our friends to the Society of their families &c. that we in Common with other Citizens of the State of , may enjoy all the rights and privileges of freemen. Your Memorialists have under all Circumstances paid the greatest respect to the laws of the , and if any should break the same, they have never felt a disposition to screen such from justice, but when under false pretences, to gratify and satiate a revengeful disposition; for the Citizens of another State, regardless of both the laws of God and Man, to come and kidnap our friends, to carry off our Citizens, to cruelly treat our brethren; Such offenders we think should be brought to an account, to be dealt with according to their merit or demerit; that we may enjoy the privileges guaranteed to us by the Constitution of the . We therefore humbly pray that your will satisfy yourself of the gross outrage which has been committed on the Citizens of this , and with that energy which is so characteristic of your ’s administration, take such steps as you may deem best calculated to repair the injuries which your Memorialists have sustained— that you will vindicate the injured laws of the . In conclusion we beg leave to assure your , that in the discharge of this, as well as every other Constitutional movement you may rely upon the hearty co-operation of your Memorialists. — — — — — — — — — — — — — who respectfully submit to your the accompanying Resolutions, which were passed at a large meeting held in this place on this day, and also the Affidavit of one of those persons who was kidnapped, but fortunately has made his escape” [HC 4:160]
15 July 1840 • Wednesday
15 Extract of a letter from Elder William Barratt dated “Deptford July 15. 1840” on his way to South Australia
“Dear Brother in Christ, I write to inform you of my arrival in the metropolis this morning, after a tedious journey, in the midst of much profaneness and swearing, such as I never heard in my life before. I feel, as the Apostle expresses it, like a lamb among wolves, going into a land of strangers to preach the Gospel; therefore I desire your prayers in my behalf. I have witnessed much of the Spirit of Revelation since Sunday; in fact, I only thought it a mere thought, when the Elders testified that they were called by Revelation; but now I know [p. 1081]
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