History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 924
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<April 18> kill us, We had little prayer Meetings, they said if we did not stop them, they would kill every man, woman and child, we had spelling schools for our little children, they said if we did not stop them, they would kill every man, woman and child, we did our own milking, got our own wood, no men to help us I started the first of February for without money (mob all the way) drove my own team, slept out of doors, I had four small Children, we suffered hunger, fatigue, and cold, for what? for our religion. Where in a boasted land of liberty, deny your faith, or die, was the cry; I will mention some of the names of the heads of the mob, two brothers by the name of Comstock, William Man[n], Benjamin Ashby, Robert White, one by the name of , who took an old scythe, and cut an old white headed all to pieces— I wish further also to state that when the mob came there (as I was told by one of them afterwards) their intention was to kill every thing belonging to us that had life; and that after our men were shot down by them, they went around and shot all the dead men over again, to make sure of their lives.
I now leave it with this Honorable Government to say what my damages may be, or what they would be willing to see their wives and children slaughtered for, as I have seen my , son, and others— I lost in property by the mob To goods stolen fifty dollars, one pocket book, and fifty dollars cash notes; Damage of horses and kine one hundred dollars, one gun ten dollars, In short, my all. whole damages are more than the State of is worth. Written by my own hand this 18 day of April 1839. Amanda Smith. , Adams County, Illinois.”
Thus are the cries of the Widow and the Fatherless ascending to Heaven. How long O Lord wilt thou not avenge the blood of the Saints.
19 April 1839 • Friday
<19> Friday 19. Elders and had travelled but a few miles when an axle tree broke, [HC 3:325] and had to go to after some boxes which hindered them some days.
20 April 1839 • Saturday
<20> Saturday 20. The last of the Saints left
21 April 1839 • Sunday
<21> Sunday 21 I had still continued my journey— [HC 3:326]
22 April 1839 • Monday
<22> Monday 22 We continued on our journey both by night and by day, and after suffering much fatigue and hunger, I arrived in , Illinois, amidst the congratulations of my friends and the embraces of my family. whom I found as well as could be expected considering what they had been called to <Lawyers fees> endure, Before leaving I had paid the Lawyers at thirty four thousand dollars, in Cash, Lands &c one Lot which I let them have in for seven thousand dollars, they were soon offered ten thousand dollars for it, but would not accept it— for other vexatious suits which I had to contend against, the few months I was in this , I paid Lawyers fees to the amount of about sixteen thousand dollars, making in all about fifty thousand dollars— for which I received very little in return, for sometimes they were afraid to act on account of the mob, and sometimes they were so drunk, as to incapacitate them for business— but there were a few honorable exceptions—
Among those who have been the chief instruments, and leading characters, in the [p. 924]
April 18 kill us, We had little prayer Meetings, they said if we did not stop them, they would kill every man, woman and child, we had spelling schools for our little children, they said if we did not stop them, they would kill every man, woman and child, we did our own milking, got our own wood, no men to help us I started the first of February for without money (mob all the way) drove my own team, slept out of doors, I had four small Children, we suffered hunger, fatigue, and cold, for what? for our religion. Where in a boasted land of liberty, deny your faith, or die, was the cry; I will mention some of the names of the heads of the mob, two brothers by the name of Comstock, William Mann, Benjamin Ashby, Robert White, one by the name of , who took an old scythe, and cut an old white headed all to pieces— I wish further also to state that when the mob came there (as I was told by one of them afterwards) their intention was to kill every thing belonging to us that had life; and that after our men were shot down by them, they went around and shot all the dead men over again, to make sure of their lives.
I now leave it with this Honorable Government to say what my damages may be, or what they would be willing to see their wives and children slaughtered for, as I have seen my , son, and others— I lost in property by the mob To goods stolen fifty dollars, one pocket book, and fifty dollars cash notes; Damage of horses and kine one hundred dollars, one gun ten dollars, In short, my all. whole damages are more than the State of is worth. Written by my own hand this 18 day of April 1839. Amanda Smith. , Adams County, Illinois.”
Thus are the cries of the Widow and the Fatherless ascending to Heaven. How long O Lord wilt thou not avenge the blood of the Saints.
19 April 1839 • Friday
19 Friday 19. Elders and had travelled but a few miles when an axle tree broke, [HC 3:325] and had to go to after some boxes which hindered them some days.
20 April 1839 • Saturday
20 Saturday 20. The last of the Saints left
21 April 1839 • Sunday
21 Sunday 21 I had still continued my journey— [HC 3:326]
22 April 1839 • Monday
22 Monday 22 We continued on our journey both by night and by day, and after suffering much fatigue and hunger, I arrived in , Illinois, amidst the congratulations of my friends and the embraces of my family. whom I found as well as could be expected considering what they had been called to Lawyers fees endure, Before leaving I had paid the Lawyers at thirty four thousand dollars, in Cash, Lands &c one Lot which I let them have in for seven thousand dollars, they were soon offered ten thousand dollars for it, but would not accept it— for other vexatious suits which I had to contend against, the few months I was in this , I paid Lawyers fees to the amount of about sixteen thousand dollars, making in all about fifty thousand dollars— for which I received very little in return, for sometimes they were afraid to act on account of the mob, and sometimes they were so drunk, as to incapacitate them for business— but there were a few honorable exceptions—
Among those who have been the chief instruments, and leading characters, in the [p. 924]
Page 924