History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1086
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<July 27> persecution in you are [HC 4:169] aware I proferred you my utmost energies, and had not the conflict — — — terminated so speedily, I should have been with you then. God be thanked for your rescue from the hands of a savage but cowardly foe! I do not expect to resign my Office of “Quarter Master General of the State of ,” in the event of my removal to , unless you advise otherwise: I shall likewise expect to practise my profession; but at the same time your people shall have all the benefit of my speaking powers and my untiring energies in behalf of the good and holy faith. In necessariis unitas, in non necessariis libertas, in omnibus charitas, shall be my motto, with the suaviter in modo, fortiter in re; Be so good as to inform me circumstantially of the population of and , the face of the County, climate, soil, health &c &c How many of your people are concentrated there? Please to write me in full immediately. Louisville Paper will accompany this— please enquire for it. With sentiments of profound respect and esteem suffer me to subscribe myself— Yours respectfully .”
sailed for Ireland from .
28 July 1840 • Tuesday
July 28. 1840. Esqre.— Dear Sir— I acknowledge the receipt of yours of last month giving me the numbers of the Land on Rock River, which you felt disposed to sell. In reply to which I have to say that we have not yet examined the land, and consequently have not arrived at any conclusions respect[HC 4:170]ing it, but it is probable that some of my friends will visit it this fall, and if we should think it wisdom to locate there, or on the other tract you will be informed of the same and arrangements entered into— I am sorry that your health has been so poor but hope ’ere this you are perfectly recovered. It would afford me great pleasure indeed could I hold out any prospect of the two notes due next month being met at maturity or even this fall. Having had considerable difficulty (necessarily consequent on a new Settlement) to contend with, as well as poverty and considerable sickness, our first payment will be probably somewhat delayed until we again get a good start in the world— I am happy to say, the prospect is indeed favorable— under these circumstances we shall have to claim your indulgence which I have no doubt will be extended. However every exertion on our part shall be made to meet the demands against us. so that if we cannot accomplish all we wish to. it will be “our misfortune and not our fault” Notwithstanding the impoverished condition of our people and the adverse circumstances under which we have had to labor. I hope we shall eventually rise above them and again enjoy the blessings of health peace and plenty. You are informed in a former letter that we had paid Mr. the one thousand dollars specified in your bond, a few days ago he call at this place and agreed to give us a deed for the ninety acres (less one half acre) providing I would give him an indemnifying bond, and pay the interest due from you to him on the one thousand dollars which I agreed to do. I have therefore got the deed for the land and paid him the interest. [p. 1086]
July 27 persecution in you are [HC 4:169] aware I proferred you my utmost energies, and had not the conflict — — — terminated so speedily, I should have been with you then. God be thanked for your rescue from the hands of a savage but cowardly foe! I do not expect to resign my Office of “Quarter Master General of the State of ,” in the event of my removal to , unless you advise otherwise: I shall likewise expect to practise my profession; but at the same time your people shall have all the benefit of my speaking powers and my untiring energies in behalf of the good and holy faith. In necessariis unitas, in non necessariis libertas, in omnibus charitas, shall be my motto, with the suaviter in modo, fortiter in re; Be so good as to inform me circumstantially of the population of and , the face of the County, climate, soil, health &c &c How many of your people are concentrated there? Please to write me in full immediately. Louisville Paper will accompany this— please enquire for it. With sentiments of profound respect and esteem suffer me to subscribe myself— Yours respectfully .”
sailed for Ireland from .
28 July 1840 • Tuesday
July 28. 1840. Esqre.— Dear Sir— I acknowledge the receipt of yours of last month giving me the numbers of the Land on Rock River, which you felt disposed to sell. In reply to which I have to say that we have not yet examined the land, and consequently have not arrived at any conclusions respect[HC 4:170]ing it, but it is probable that some of my friends will visit it this fall, and if we should think it wisdom to locate there, or on the other tract you will be informed of the same and arrangements entered into— I am sorry that your health has been so poor but hope ’ere this you are perfectly recovered. It would afford me great pleasure indeed could I hold out any prospect of the two notes due next month being met at maturity or even this fall. Having had considerable difficulty (necessarily consequent on a new Settlement) to contend with, as well as poverty and considerable sickness, our first payment will be probably somewhat delayed until we again get a good start in the world— I am happy to say, the prospect is indeed favorable— under these circumstances we shall have to claim your indulgence which I have no doubt will be extended. However every exertion on our part shall be made to meet the demands against us. so that if we cannot accomplish all we wish to. it will be “our misfortune and not our fault” Notwithstanding the impoverished condition of our people and the adverse circumstances under which we have had to labor. I hope we shall eventually rise above them and again enjoy the blessings of health peace and plenty. You are informed in a former letter that we had paid Mr. the one thousand dollars specified in your bond, a few days ago he call at this place and agreed to give us a deed for the ninety acres (less one half acre) providing I would give him an indemnifying bond, and pay the interest due from you to him on the one thousand dollars which I agreed to do. I have therefore got the deed for the land and paid him the interest. [p. 1086]
Page 1086