History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 943
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<May 22> the twenty second with irons round the wrist of each, and in this fix they were taken from Prison and placed in a carriage. The people of gathered round them to see them depart; but none seemed to feel for them except two persons. One of these (’s lady) bowed to them through the window, and looked as if touched with pity. The other was , Merchant of , who bowed with some feeling as they passed. They then took leave of , accompanied by Sheriff Brown, and four guards, with drawn pistols, and moved on towards Columbia. It had been thundering and raining for some days and the thunder storm lasted with but short cessations from the time they started, till they arrived at the place of destination, which was five days. The small streams were swollen so as to be very difficult in crossing them.
23 May 1839 • Thursday
<23> Thursday 23. The prisoners came to a creek which was several rods over, with a strong current, and very deep. It was towards evening, and far from any house, and they had received no refreshment through the day. Here they halted, and knew not what to do; they waited a while for the water [HC 3:360] to fall, but it fell slowly. All hands were hungry and impatient, and a lowery night seemed to threaten that the creek would rise before morning by the falling of additional rains. In this dilemma, some councilled one thing, and some another. At last proposed to the Sheriff, that if he would take off his Irons, he would go into the Water to bathe; and by that means ascertain the depth and bottom; this he consented to do after some hesitation. he then plunged into the Stream, and swam across, and attempted to wade back. he found it to be a hard bottom, and the water about up to his chin; but a very stiff Current. After this, Mr. Brown, the Sheriff, undertook to cross on his horse; but was thrown off and buried in the stream. This accident decided the fate of the day. Being now completely wet, he resolved to effect the crossing of the whole company, bag and baggage. Accordingly several stripped off their clothes and mounted on the bare backs of the horses; and, taking their clothing, saddles, and arms, together with our trunk and bedding upon their shoulders, they bore them across in safety without wetting. This was done by riding backwards and forwards, across the Stream several times. In this sport and labor, prisoners, guards and all, mingled in mutual exertion. All was now safe but the Carriage. Mr. [Morris] Phelps then proposed to swim that across, by hitching two horses before it; and he mounted on one of their backs, while and one of the Guards swam by the side of the Carriage to keep it from upsetting by the force of the current. And thus, Paul like, they all got safe to Land. Every thing was soon replaced; and prisoners in the Carriage, and the suite on horseback, moving swiftly on, and at dark arrived at a house of entertainment, amid a terrible thunder storm.
I was busy in counseling, writing letters and attending to General business of the Church this week— [HC 3:361] [p. 943]
May 22 the twenty second with irons round the wrist of each, and in this fix they were taken from Prison and placed in a carriage. The people of gathered round them to see them depart; but none seemed to feel for them except two persons. One of these (’s lady) bowed to them through the window, and looked as if touched with pity. The other was , Merchant of , who bowed with some feeling as they passed. They then took leave of , accompanied by Sheriff Brown, and four guards, with drawn pistols, and moved on towards Columbia. It had been thundering and raining for some days and the thunder storm lasted with but short cessations from the time they started, till they arrived at the place of destination, which was five days. The small streams were swollen so as to be very difficult in crossing them.
23 May 1839 • Thursday
23 Thursday 23. The prisoners came to a creek which was several rods over, with a strong current, and very deep. It was towards evening, and far from any house, and they had received no refreshment through the day. Here they halted, and knew not what to do; they waited a while for the water [HC 3:360] to fall, but it fell slowly. All hands were hungry and impatient, and a lowery night seemed to threaten that the creek would rise before morning by the falling of additional rains. In this dilemma, some councilled one thing, and some another. At last proposed to the Sheriff, that if he would take off his Irons, he would go into the Water to bathe; and by that means ascertain the depth and bottom; this he consented to do after some hesitation. he then plunged into the Stream, and swam across, and attempted to wade back. he found it to be a hard bottom, and the water about up to his chin; but a very stiff Current. After this, Mr. Brown, the Sheriff, undertook to cross on his horse; but was thrown off and buried in the stream. This accident decided the fate of the day. Being now completely wet, he resolved to effect the crossing of the whole company, bag and baggage. Accordingly several stripped off their clothes and mounted on the bare backs of the horses; and, taking their clothing, saddles, and arms, together with our trunk and bedding upon their shoulders, they bore them across in safety without wetting. This was done by riding backwards and forwards, across the Stream several times. In this sport and labor, prisoners, guards and all, mingled in mutual exertion. All was now safe but the Carriage. Mr. Morris Phelps then proposed to swim that across, by hitching two horses before it; and he mounted on one of their backs, while and one of the Guards swam by the side of the Carriage to keep it from upsetting by the force of the current. And thus, Paul like, they all got safe to Land. Every thing was soon replaced; and prisoners in the Carriage, and the suite on horseback, moving swiftly on, and at dark arrived at a house of entertainment, amid a terrible thunder storm.
I was busy in counseling, writing letters and attending to General business of the Church this week— [HC 3:361] [p. 943]
Page 943