History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 946
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<May 26> Mr. Brown hired a carriage, and we rode into Columbia. It was about Sun set on Sunday evening, and as the Carriage and our armed attendants drove through the Streets, we were gazed upon with astonishment by hundreds of Spectators who thronged the Streets, and looked out at the windows, doors &c anxious to get a glimpse of the strange beings called Mormons. On our arrival we were immediately hurried to the prison, without going to a tavern for refreshment, although we had traveled a long summer day without any thing to eat— When unloosed from our fetters, we were ushered immediately from the Carriage into the Jail, and the next moment a huge trap door was opened, and down we went into a most dismal dungeon, which was full of cobwebs and filth above, below, and all around the walls, having stood empty for near two years. Here was neither beds, nor chairs, nor water, nor food, nor friends, nor any one on whom we might call, even for a drink of cold water; for Brown and all others had withdrawn to go where they could refresh themselves. When thrust into this dungeon, we were nearly ready to faint with hunger, and thirst, and weariness. We walked the room for a few moments, and then sank down upon the floor in despondency, and wished to die; for like Elijah of old, if the Lord had enquired, “What dost thou here?” we could have replied, “Lord, they have killed the Prophets, and thrown down thine altars, and have driven out all they Saints from the Land, and we only are left to <tell> thee; and they seek our lives, to take them away; and now, therefore, let us die.” When we had been in the dungeon some time, our new jailer handed down some provisions, but by this time, I was too faint to eat; I tasted a few mouthfuls, and then suddenly the trap door opened, and some chairs were handed to us, and the new Sheriff, Mr. Martin, and his deputy, Mr. Hamilton, entered our dungeon, and talked so kindly to us, that our spirits again revived in some measure. This night we slept cold and uncomfortable; having but little bedding, Next morning we were suffered to come out of the dungeon, and the liberty of the upper room was given us through the day ever afterwards. We now began to receive kind treatment from our jailor, and from our new Sheriff; for it was Mr. Brown that had caused all our neglect [HC 3:365] and sufferings the previous evening. Our jail in Columbia was a large wooden block building with two apartments; one was occupied by the jailor and his family, and the other by the prisoners.
27 May 1839 • Monday
<Letter to M. Bigler 27> Monday 27. I was at home Hancock Co. Ill. 27 May 1839—
“Father Biggler— Dear Sir— We have thought well to write you by on the subject of our purchase of lands here, in order to stir up your pure mind to a remembrance of the Situation in which we have been placed by the Act of the Councils of the Church having appointed us a Committee to transact business here for the Church. We have as is known to the Church in general, made purchases, and entered into Contracts and promised payments of monies for all which we now stand responsible. Now as money seems [p. 946]
May 26 Mr. Brown hired a carriage, and we rode into Columbia. It was about Sun set on Sunday evening, and as the Carriage and our armed attendants drove through the Streets, we were gazed upon with astonishment by hundreds of Spectators who thronged the Streets, and looked out at the windows, doors &c anxious to get a glimpse of the strange beings called Mormons. On our arrival we were immediately hurried to the prison, without going to a tavern for refreshment, although we had traveled a long summer day without any thing to eat— When unloosed from our fetters, we were ushered immediately from the Carriage into the Jail, and the next moment a huge trap door was opened, and down we went into a most dismal dungeon, which was full of cobwebs and filth above, below, and all around the walls, having stood empty for near two years. Here was neither beds, nor chairs, nor water, nor food, nor friends, nor any one on whom we might call, even for a drink of cold water; for Brown and all others had withdrawn to go where they could refresh themselves. When thrust into this dungeon, we were nearly ready to faint with hunger, and thirst, and weariness. We walked the room for a few moments, and then sank down upon the floor in despondency, and wished to die; for like Elijah of old, if the Lord had enquired, “What dost thou here?” we could have replied, “Lord, they have killed the Prophets, and thrown down thine altars, and have driven out all they Saints from the Land, and we only are left to tell thee; and they seek our lives, to take them away; and now, therefore, let us die.” When we had been in the dungeon some time, our new jailer handed down some provisions, but by this time, I was too faint to eat; I tasted a few mouthfuls, and then suddenly the trap door opened, and some chairs were handed to us, and the new Sheriff, Mr. Martin, and his deputy, Mr. Hamilton, entered our dungeon, and talked so kindly to us, that our spirits again revived in some measure. This night we slept cold and uncomfortable; having but little bedding, Next morning we were suffered to come out of the dungeon, and the liberty of the upper room was given us through the day ever afterwards. We now began to receive kind treatment from our jailor, and from our new Sheriff; for it was Mr. Brown that had caused all our neglect [HC 3:365] and sufferings the previous evening. Our jail in Columbia was a large wooden block building with two apartments; one was occupied by the jailor and his family, and the other by the prisoners.
27 May 1839 • Monday
Letter to M. Bigler 27 Monday 27. I was at home Hancock Co. Ill. 27 May 1839—
“Father Biggler— Dear Sir— We have thought well to write you by on the subject of our purchase of lands here, in order to stir up your pure mind to a remembrance of the Situation in which we have been placed by the Act of the Councils of the Church having appointed us a Committee to transact business here for the Church. We have as is known to the Church in general, made purchases, and entered into Contracts and promised payments of monies for all which we now stand responsible. Now as money seems [p. 946]
Page 946