History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 947
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<May 27> to come in too slowly— in order that we may be able to meet our engagements  we have determined to call upon the liberality of Father Biggler through the  agency of , and request that he will place in his hands for  us, the sum of five or six hundred dollars, for which he shall have the  security of the said Committee, also, through the agency of ,  and the thanks of the Church besides— Joseph Smith Jr., — To  Mr. Mark Biggler, Ill.”
<Letter to > “, Ill, 27 May 1839 Dear Sir— Having last week received a letter  from Br. concerning your late writings in the Quincy Whig,  and understanding thereby that the Church in general at were rather  uneasy concerning these matters, we have thought best to consider the matter  of course, and accordingly being in Council on Saturday last, the subject was  introduced, and discussed at some length, when an answer to ’s  Letter was agreed to, and sanctioned by the Council, which answer I expect will  be published, and of course you will have an opportunity to see it. It will  be seen by that letter that we do not at all approve of the course which you have  thought proper to take in making the subject of our sufferings a political question  at the same time you will perceive that we there express, what we really feel,  that is, a confidence in your good intentions in so doing. And (as I took occasion  to state to the Council) knowing your integrity of principle, and steadfastness in  the cause of Christ, I feel not to exercise even the privilege of Council on the  subject, save only to request, that you will endeavor to bear in mind the  importance of the subject, and how easy it might be to get into a mis understanding with the brethren concerning it, and though last, not least,  that whilst you continue to go upon your own credit, you will also steer clear  of making the Church appear as either supporting or opposing you in your  politics, lest such a course may have a tendency to bring about persecution  on the Church, where a little wisdom and caution may avoid it.  I do not know that there is any occasion for my thus cautioning you, in  this thing, but having done so, I hope it will be well taken, and that all  things shall eventually be found to work together for the good of the Saints.  I should be happy to have you here to dwell amongst us, and am in  hopes soon to have that pleasure. I was happy to receive your favor of the  20th.. inst: and to observe the Contents, and beg to say in reply that I shall  attend to what you therein suggest, and shall feel pleasure at all times to  answer any request of yours, and attend to them also in the best manner  possible. With every possible feeling of love and friendship for an old  fellow prisoner, and brother in the Lord— I remain Sir, your sincere friend  Joseph Smith Jr.— To Col. , , Ill.“
< Introduction> “, Hancock Co., Ill. 27th. May 1839— To the Church of Jesus Christ of  Latter Day Saints— Greeting— From our knowledge of the great sacrifices  made by the Bearer Br. , in behalf of the welfare of us,  and the Church generally, and from the great trust which we have often times  reposed in him, and as often found him trustworthy, not seeking his own [p. 947]
May 27 to come in too slowly— in order that we may be able to meet our engagements we have determined to call upon the liberality of Father Biggler through the agency of , and request that he will place in his hands for us, the sum of five or six hundred dollars, for which he shall have the security of the said Committee, also, through the agency of , and the thanks of the Church besides— Joseph Smith Jr., — To Mr. Mark Biggler, Ill.”
Letter to , Ill, 27 May 1839 Dear Sir— Having last week received a letter from Br. concerning your late writings in the Quincy Whig, and understanding thereby that the Church in general at were rather uneasy concerning these matters, we have thought best to consider the matter of course, and accordingly being in Council on Saturday last, the subject was introduced, and discussed at some length, when an answer to ’s Letter was agreed to, and sanctioned by the Council, which answer I expect will be published, and of course you will have an opportunity to see it. It will be seen by that letter that we do not at all approve of the course which you have thought proper to take in making the subject of our sufferings a political question at the same time you will perceive that we there express, what we really feel, that is, a confidence in your good intentions in so doing. And (as I took occasion to state to the Council) knowing your integrity of principle, and steadfastness in the cause of Christ, I feel not to exercise even the privilege of Council on the subject, save only to request, that you will endeavor to bear in mind the importance of the subject, and how easy it might be to get into a misunderstanding with the brethren concerning it, and though last, not least, that whilst you continue to go upon your own credit, you will also steer clear of making the Church appear as either supporting or opposing you in your politics, lest such a course may have a tendency to bring about persecution on the Church, where a little wisdom and caution may avoid it. I do not know that there is any occasion for my thus cautioning you, in this thing, but having done so, I hope it will be well taken, and that all things shall eventually be found to work together for the good of the Saints. I should be happy to have you here to dwell amongst us, and am in hopes soon to have that pleasure. I was happy to receive your favor of the 20th.. inst: and to observe the Contents, and beg to say in reply that I shall attend to what you therein suggest, and shall feel pleasure at all times to answer any request of yours, and attend to them also in the best manner possible. With every possible feeling of love and friendship for an old fellow prisoner, and brother in the Lord— I remain Sir, your sincere friend Joseph Smith Jr.— To Col. , , Ill.“
Introduction “, Hancock Co., Ill. 27th. May 1839— To the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints— Greeting— From our knowledge of the great sacrifices made by the Bearer Br. , in behalf of the welfare of us, and the Church generally, and from the great trust which we have often times reposed in him, and as often found him trustworthy, not seeking his own [p. 947]
Page 947