History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 975
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<November 27> with us who proposed to name the incident to that body, believing they would  reward such conduct by some public act; but on enquiring my name, to mention  as the author of their safety; and finding it to be Joseph Smith, the “Mormon Prophet”  as they called it, I heard no more of their praise, gratitude or reward—

28–29 November 1839 • Thursday–Friday

<28  Joseph at > Thursday 28 I arrived at this morning, and put up at  the corner of Missouri, and Third Streets—
This evening and Company <(except who stopped at Byron to visit his Sister)> rode to in the Steam Cars,  and from thence rode all night in a horse Coach, and arrived at ten in the  morning on Friday 29 at Auburn, New York, <Elders and proceeded on their way to .>
<Petition to Congress> The following is a copy of our Petition to Congress for redress of our  difficulties.
“To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of  the in Congress assembled— Your Petitioners Joseph Smith,   and would most respectfully represent that they  have been delegated, by their brethren and fellow Citizens, known as “Latter  Day Saints” (commonly called Mormons) to prepare, and present to you a  statement of their wrongs and a prayer for their relief which they now have the  honor to submit to the consideration of your Honorable Body. In the Summer  of 1831 a portion of the society above named commenced a settlement in the  County of in the State of . The individuals making that  settlement had emigrated from almost every State in the to that lovely  Spot in the Far West, with the hope of improving their Condition, of building  houses for themselves and posterity, and of erecting Temples where they, and  theirs, might worship their Creator according to the dictates of their conscience
Though they had wandered far from the homes of their Childhood, still  they had been taught to believe, that a Citizen born in any one State in  this great , might remove to another and enjoy all the rights and  immunities of Citizens of the State of his adoption, That wherever waved  the American flag, beneath its Stars and Stripes an American Citizen might  look for protection and justice, for liberty in person and in conscience.  They bought farms, built houses, erected Churches, some tilled the Earth,  others bought and sold merchandize, and others again, toiled in the Shape  of the Mechanic, They were industrious and moral, and they prospered,  and though often persecuted and villified for their difference in religious opinion  from their fellow Citizens, they were happy, they saw their society increasing in  numbers, their farms teemed with plenty and they fondly looked forward to a future  big with hope. That there was prejudice against them, they knew, that slanders  were propogated against them they deplored, yet they felt that these were unjust,  and hoped that time and an uprightness of life would enable them to outlive  them; while the summer of peace, happiness, and hope shone over the infant  settlement of the Saints, the cloud was gathering unseen by them, that bore in  its bosom the thunderbolt of destruction. On the 20th. July 1833 around their  peaceful village, a mob gathered to the Surprise and terror of the quiet Mormons,  why, they knew not; They had broken no law, they had harmed no man, in deed  or thought. why they were thus threatened <they knew not.>— Soon a Committee from the Mob [p. 975]
November 27 with us who proposed to name the incident to that body, believing they would reward such conduct by some public act; but on enquiring my name, to mention as the author of their safety; and finding it to be Joseph Smith, the “Mormon Prophet” as they called it, I heard no more of their praise, gratitude or reward—

28–29 November 1839 • Thursday–Friday

28 Joseph at Thursday 28 I arrived at this morning, and put up at the corner of Missouri, and Third Streets—
This evening and Company (except who stopped at Byron to visit his Sister) rode to in the Steam Cars, and from thence rode all night in a horse Coach, and arrived at ten in the morning on Friday 29 at Auburn, New York, Elders and proceeded on their way to .
Petition to Congress The following is a copy of our Petition to Congress for redress of our difficulties.
“To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the in Congress assembled— Your Petitioners Joseph Smith, and would most respectfully represent that they have been delegated, by their brethren and fellow Citizens, known as “Latter Day Saints” (commonly called Mormons) to prepare, and present to you a statement of their wrongs and a prayer for their relief which they now have the honor to submit to the consideration of your Honorable Body. In the Summer of 1831 a portion of the society above named commenced a settlement in the County of in the State of . The individuals making that settlement had emigrated from almost every State in the to that lovely Spot in the Far West, with the hope of improving their Condition, of building houses for themselves and posterity, and of erecting Temples where they, and theirs, might worship their Creator according to the dictates of their conscience
Though they had wandered far from the homes of their Childhood, still they had been taught to believe, that a Citizen born in any one State in this great , might remove to another and enjoy all the rights and immunities of Citizens of the State of his adoption, That wherever waved the American flag, beneath its Stars and Stripes an American Citizen might look for protection and justice, for liberty in person and in conscience. They bought farms, built houses, erected Churches, some tilled the Earth, others bought and sold merchandize, and others again, toiled in the Shape of the Mechanic, They were industrious and moral, and they prospered, and though often persecuted and villified for their difference in religious opinion from their fellow Citizens, they were happy, they saw their society increasing in numbers, their farms teemed with plenty and they fondly looked forward to a future big with hope. That there was prejudice against them, they knew, that slanders were propogated against them they deplored, yet they felt that these were unjust, and hoped that time and an uprightness of life would enable them to outlive them; while the summer of peace, happiness, and hope shone over the infant settlement of the Saints, the cloud was gathering unseen by them, that bore in its bosom the thunderbolt of destruction. On the 20th. July 1833 around their peaceful village, a mob gathered to the Surprise and terror of the quiet Mormons, why, they knew not; They had broken no law, they had harmed no man, in deed or thought. why they were thus threatened they knew not.— Soon a Committee from the Mob [p. 975]
Page 975