History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 861
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30 November 1838 • Friday

<November 30  Conveyed to Liberty Jail> Friday 30. About this time those of us who had been sentenced thereto were conveyed  to Liberty Jail, put in close confinement, and all communication with our friends cut off  During our trial accompanied by and others  at times were busy in plundering and robbing the houses of , ,  and the Widow Phoebe Ann Patten, and others under pretence or Color of law, or an  order from , as testified to by the members of the different families robbed.

1 December 1838 • Saturday

<December 1.  Committees meet> Saturday December 1. 1838
“At a meeting of the committee on the part of the Mormons  and a like Committee on the part of the citizens of met at on this first Dec. 1838. The following propositions by the Mormon  Committee were made & agreed to by the Committee—
1st. That the Mormon Committee be allowed to employ say 20 teamsters for the  purpose of hauling off their property. 2nd. That the Mormon Committee collect  whatever stock they may have in at some point & some 2 or 3  of the : Committee be notified to attend for the purpose of examining  said Stock. & convey or attend the Mormon Committee out of the limits of the  — & it is further understood that the Mormon Committee is not to drive  or take from this : any stock of any description at any other time, nor under  any other circumstances than these mentioned As witness our hands—
, Dr. K. Kerr, Committee— The above——  propositions were made and agreed to by the undersigned, committee on the  part of the Mormons— William Huntington, B[enjamin] S. Wilber, , ,  Z. Wilson.”

5 December 1838 • Wednesday

<5.> Wednesday 5. The Legislature having assembled, laid before  the house of Representatives all the information in his possession relative to the  difficulties between the Mob and “Mormons”

10 December 1838 • Monday

<10> Monday 10th. "
<Memorial to  Legislature> “To the Honorable Legislature of the State of , in Senate and House of Representatives  convened. We the undersigned petitioners, inhabitants of , Missouri,  in consequence of the late calamity that has come upon us, taken in connection  with former afflictions, feel it a duty we owe to ourselves and our Country, to lay our  case before your honorable body for consideration. It is a well known fact, that a  Society of our people commenced settling in , Missouri, in the Summer  of 1831, where they, according to their ability, purchased lands and settled upon them  with the intention and expectation of becoming permanent Citizens in common  with others— Soon after the Settlement began, persecution began, and as the Society  increased, persecution also increased, until the Society at last was compelled to leave  the . And although an account of these persecutions has been published to  the world, yet we feel that it will not be improper to notice a few of the most prominent  items in this memorial. On the 20th. of July 1833, a mob convened at  a Committee of which called upon a few of the men of our Church there, and stated  to them that the , and indeed all other Mechanic shops must be  closed forthwith, and the Society leave the immediately. These propositions  were so unexpected, that a certain time was asked for, to consider on the subject, before an  answer should be returned, which was refused, and our men being individually interrogated, [p. 861]

30 November 1838 • Friday

November 30 Conveyed to Liberty Jail Friday 30. About this time those of us who had been sentenced thereto were conveyed to Liberty Jail, put in close confinement, and all communication with our friends cut off During our trial accompanied by and others at times were busy in plundering and robbing the houses of , , and the Widow Phoebe Ann Patten, and others under pretence or Color of law, or an order from , as testified to by the members of the different families robbed.

1 December 1838 • Saturday

December 1. Committees meet Saturday December 1. 1838
“At a meeting of the committee on the part of the Mormons and a like Committee on the part of the citizens of met at on this first Dec. 1838. The following propositions by the Mormon Committee were made & agreed to by the Committee—
1st. That the Mormon Committee be allowed to employ say 20 teamsters for the purpose of hauling off their property. 2nd. That the Mormon Committee collect whatever stock they may have in at some point & some 2 or 3 of the : Committee be notified to attend for the purpose of examining said Stock. & convey or attend the Mormon Committee out of the limits of the — & it is further understood that the Mormon Committee is not to drive or take from this : any stock of any description at any other time, nor under any other circumstances than these mentioned As witness our hands—
, Dr. K. Kerr, Committee— The above—— propositions were made and agreed to by the undersigned, committee on the part of the Mormons— William Huntington, Benjamin S. Wilber, , , Z. Wilson.”

5 December 1838 • Wednesday

5. Wednesday 5. The Legislature having assembled, laid before the house of Representatives all the information in his possession relative to the difficulties between the Mob and “Mormons”

10 December 1838 • Monday

10 Monday 10th. "
Memorial to Legislature “To the Honorable Legislature of the State of , in Senate and House of Representatives convened. We the undersigned petitioners, inhabitants of , Missouri, in consequence of the late calamity that has come upon us, taken in connection with former afflictions, feel it a duty we owe to ourselves and our Country, to lay our case before your honorable body for consideration. It is a well known fact, that a Society of our people commenced settling in , Missouri, in the Summer of 1831, where they, according to their ability, purchased lands and settled upon them with the intention and expectation of becoming permanent Citizens in common with others— Soon after the Settlement began, persecution began, and as the Society increased, persecution also increased, until the Society at last was compelled to leave the . And although an account of these persecutions has been published to the world, yet we feel that it will not be improper to notice a few of the most prominent items in this memorial. On the 20th. of July 1833, a mob convened at a Committee of which called upon a few of the men of our Church there, and stated to them that the , and indeed all other Mechanic shops must be closed forthwith, and the Society leave the immediately. These propositions were so unexpected, that a certain time was asked for, to consider on the subject, before an answer should be returned, which was refused, and our men being individually interrogated, [p. 861]
Page 861