History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<April 14  36 families at  Tenneys Grove> The Committee moved Thirty six families into Tenney’s Grove about twenty five  miles from , and a few men were appointed to chop wood for them,  while was to furnish them with Meal and Meat until they could  be removed to . The Corn was ground at the Committee’s Horse Mill in   was obliged to Secrete himself in the Corn fields &c  during the day, and was in at night counselling the Committee and brethren

15 April 1839 • Monday

<15  Joseph left > Monday 15. Having procured a change of venue we started for Boone  County, and were conducted on our way to that place by a strong guard—
This evening the Committee met to make arrangements concerning teams  and the moving of the few families who yet remain at .

16 April 1839 • Tuesday

April 16. 1839. To Joseph Smith Jr. and others, Prisoners  in or elsewhere— Greeting— Dear Brethren in affliction— Through  the Mercy and Providence of God, I am here alive and in tolerable health,  as also are all of your families as far as I know, having heard from  them lately, and having seen yesterday. Brethren I have  sorrow of heart when I think of your great sufferings by that ungodly Mob  which has spread such desolation, and caused so much suffering among us.  I often reflect on the scenes which we passed through together, the course  we pursued, the councillings we had, the results which followed, when  harassed, pressed on every side, insulted and abused by that lawless banditti—  and am decidedly of opinion that the hand of the Great God hath controlled  the whole business for purposes of his own which will eventually work out good  for the Saints; (I mean those who are worthy of that name) knowing that your  intentions, and the intentions of all the worthy Saints have been pure, and  tending to do good to all men, and to injure no man in person or property  except we were forced to it in defence of our lives— Brethren I am  aware that I cannot wholly realize your sufferings, neither can any other  person who has not experienced the like affliction, but I doubt not for a  moment, neither have I ever doubted for a moment, but that the same God  which delivered me from their grasp, (though narrowly) will deliver you.  I staid near for about three weeks being hunted by them almost  every day, and as I learned they did not intend to give me the chance of  a trial but put an end to me forthwith I sent for my horse and left the  wicked clan and came off— is with his Uncle in . I  received a letter lately from him, he is strong in the faith, I now live in  the Big Neck Prairie, on the same Farm with who is  here with me and waiting for me with his riding dress on to go home, so  I must necessarily close, praying God to speedily deliver you and bless you.  From yours in the bonds of the everlasting love ”—
This evening our Guard got intoxicated, we thought it a favorable opportunity  to make our escape; knowing that the only object of our enemies was our destruction  and likewise knowing that a number of our brethren had been massacred by  them on , amongst whom were two children; and that they sought  every opportunity to abuse others who were left in that state,; and that they [p. 921]
April 14 36 families at Tenneys Grove The Committee moved Thirty six families into Tenney’s Grove about twenty five miles from , and a few men were appointed to chop wood for them, while was to furnish them with Meal and Meat until they could be removed to . The Corn was ground at the Committee’s Horse Mill in was obliged to Secrete himself in the Corn fields &c during the day, and was in at night counselling the Committee and brethren

15 April 1839 • Monday

15 Joseph left Monday 15. Having procured a change of venue we started for Boone County, and were conducted on our way to that place by a strong guard—
This evening the Committee met to make arrangements concerning teams and the moving of the few families who yet remain at .

16 April 1839 • Tuesday

April 16. 1839. To Joseph Smith Jr. and others, Prisoners in or elsewhere— Greeting— Dear Brethren in affliction— Through the Mercy and Providence of God, I am here alive and in tolerable health, as also are all of your families as far as I know, having heard from them lately, and having seen yesterday. Brethren I have sorrow of heart when I think of your great sufferings by that ungodly Mob which has spread such desolation, and caused so much suffering among us. I often reflect on the scenes which we passed through together, the course we pursued, the councillings we had, the results which followed, when harassed, pressed on every side, insulted and abused by that lawless banditti— and am decidedly of opinion that the hand of the Great God hath controlled the whole business for purposes of his own which will eventually work out good for the Saints; (I mean those who are worthy of that name) knowing that your intentions, and the intentions of all the worthy Saints have been pure, and tending to do good to all men, and to injure no man in person or property except we were forced to it in defence of our lives— Brethren I am aware that I cannot wholly realize your sufferings, neither can any other person who has not experienced the like affliction, but I doubt not for a moment, neither have I ever doubted for a moment, but that the same God which delivered me from their grasp, (though narrowly) will deliver you. I staid near for about three weeks being hunted by them almost every day, and as I learned they did not intend to give me the chance of a trial but put an end to me forthwith I sent for my horse and left the wicked clan and came off— is with his Uncle in . I received a letter lately from him, he is strong in the faith, I now live in the Big Neck Prairie, on the same Farm with who is here with me and waiting for me with his riding dress on to go home, so I must necessarily close, praying God to speedily deliver you and bless you. From yours in the bonds of the everlasting love ”—
This evening our Guard got intoxicated, we thought it a favorable opportunity to make our escape; knowing that the only object of our enemies was our destruction and likewise knowing that a number of our brethren had been massacred by them on , amongst whom were two children; and that they sought every opportunity to abuse others who were left in that state,; and that they [p. 921]
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