History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<April 12> the pelting storm, I am Gentlemen very respectfully your obt. servt. Executive Office , March 1839. Dear Sir— On my return to this , after a few weeks absence in the interior of the , I received your letter of the 25th. ult in which you give a short account of the sufferings of the people called Mormons and ask “whether they could be permitted to purchase lands [HC 3:317] and settle upon them in the , and there worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences, secure from oppression” &c— In answer to your enquiry, I would say that I know of no authority that can constitutionally deprive them of this right. They are Citizens of the , and are entitled to all the rights and privileges of other Citizens. The 2nd. section of the 4th. article of the Constitution of the (which all are solemnly bound to support) declares that “the Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of Citizens in the several States,” this privilege extends in full force to the Territories of the . The first amendment to the Constitution of the declares that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” The ordinance of Congress of the 13th. July 1787 for the government of the Territory northwest of the River Ohio, secures to the Citizens of said Territory, and the Citizens of the States thereafter to be founed therein, certain privileges which were, by the late Act of Congress organizing the , extended to the Citizens of this . The first fundamental article in that Ordinance, which is declared to be for ever unalterable, except by common consent, reads as follows, to wit: “No person demeaning himself in a peaceable and orderly manner, shall ever be molested on account of his mode of worship of religious sentiments in said .” These principles I trust will ever be adhered to in the . They make no distinction between Religious Sects. They extend equal privileges and protection to all; each must rest upon its own merit and will prosper in proportion to the purity of its principles, and the fruit of holiness and piety produced thereby. With regard to the peculiar people mentioned in your letter, I know but little. They had a community in the Northern part of for several years, and I have no recollection of ever having heard in that State of any complaint against them for violating the laws of the Country. Their religious opinions I conceive has nothing to do with our political transactions. They are Citizens of the , and are entitled to the same political rights and legal protection that other Citizens are entitled to— The foregoing are briefly my views on the subject of your enquiries— With sincere respect, I am your obedient servant— — (To) Esqre. Illinois” [HC 3:318]
13 April 1839 • Saturday
<13> Saturday 13. went to to close the business of the Church in that Region.
14 April 1839 • Sunday
<14> Sunday 14. The Committee in Council resolved to send Sisters Fosdick and Meeks and Brother William Monjar and another family, with Brother Jones, Burton’s and Barlow’s teams, which had recently arrived from . [p. 920]
April 12 the pelting storm, I am Gentlemen very respectfully your obt. servt. — Executive Office , March 1839. Dear Sir— On my return to this , after a few weeks absence in the interior of the , I received your letter of the 25th. ult in which you give a short account of the sufferings of the people called Mormons and ask “whether they could be permitted to purchase lands [HC 3:317] and settle upon them in the , and there worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences, secure from oppression” &c— In answer to your enquiry, I would say that I know of no authority that can constitutionally deprive them of this right. They are Citizens of the , and are entitled to all the rights and privileges of other Citizens. The 2nd. section of the 4th. article of the Constitution of the (which all are solemnly bound to support) declares that “the Citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of Citizens in the several States,” this privilege extends in full force to the Territories of the . The first amendment to the Constitution of the declares that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” The ordinance of Congress of the 13th. July 1787 for the government of the Territory northwest of the River Ohio, secures to the Citizens of said Territory, and the Citizens of the States thereafter to be founed therein, certain privileges which were, by the late Act of Congress organizing the , extended to the Citizens of this . The first fundamental article in that Ordinance, which is declared to be for ever unalterable, except by common consent, reads as follows, to wit: “No person demeaning himself in a peaceable and orderly manner, shall ever be molested on account of his mode of worship of religious sentiments in said .” These principles I trust will ever be adhered to in the . They make no distinction between Religious Sects. They extend equal privileges and protection to all; each must rest upon its own merit and will prosper in proportion to the purity of its principles, and the fruit of holiness and piety produced thereby. With regard to the peculiar people mentioned in your letter, I know but little. They had a community in the Northern part of for several years, and I have no recollection of ever having heard in that State of any complaint against them for violating the laws of the Country. Their religious opinions I conceive has nothing to do with our political transactions. They are Citizens of the , and are entitled to the same political rights and legal protection that other Citizens are entitled to— The foregoing are briefly my views on the subject of your enquiries— With sincere respect, I am your obedient servant— — (To) Esqre. Illinois” [HC 3:318]
13 April 1839 • Saturday
13 Saturday 13. went to to close the business of the Church in that Region.
14 April 1839 • Sunday
14 Sunday 14. The Committee in Council resolved to send Sisters Fosdick and Meeks and Brother William Monjar and another family, with Brother Jones, Burton’s and Barlow’s teams, which had recently arrived from . [p. 920]
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