History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 853
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<November 2> and otherwise, under their Commander , marched out of their town, through the  space into our square, formed a hollow square, and grounded their arms.  then rode forward and delivered up to me his sword and pistols, I then directed  a company from the respective Brigades, to form a front, rear, right and left, plank  guards, and to march the Prisoners back to , and protect and take charge  of them until the next morning. I then detailed a Company from ’s  command, to take charge of the arms. Then, in order to gratify the army and to let  the Mormons see our forces, marched around the Town, and through the principal Streets,  and back to head quarters. Considering the war at an end in this place, I issued  orders for ’s Brigade, with the exception of one Company and Gen. Graham’s  Brigade, to take up their line of March for their respective head Quarters, and  dismiss their men— and directed to take charge of the prisoners  (demanded for trial) and arms, and to march them to my Head Quarters at  , to await further orders, and to dismiss all except a guard for the  prisoners and arms. Nov.r 2nd. I relieved the guard placed over the Prisoners at   by 4 Companies of Brigade, and placed them under the command  of Col Thompson, 2 Brig, 3 Div. with instructions to report to . The balance  of brigade with ’s Company, of ’s Brigade under  the command of , I ordered to , a Mormon Town in  Daviess County, with instructions to disarm the Mormon forces at that place, and to  leave a guard of 50 men for the protection of prisoners, and to report to .  In order to carry the treaty and stipulation, into effect, I have required your Aid  de-camp, Col Williams, together with Col. Burch and , of , to attend  to drawing up the papers legally, and directed Col. Thompson to wait on them  with a portion of his command, and to cause all their orders and requirements,  consistent with the stipulations to be carried into effect. This day about 12 o’clock  there was a Battalion of 100 men from Platte arrived at , which I ordered  back, having understood that would be on in a day or two, with  sufficient force to operate in and , and for any service that  may be required.” “— Major General— Commanding— ”
3 November 1838 • Saturday
<3.  Joseph, hurried across  the > Saturday 3. We continued our March and arrived at the which  separated us from , where we hurried across the ferry when  but few troops passed. The truth was had sent an express from   to , to have the Prisoners sent to him, and thus prevent our  going to , both armies being competitors for the honor of possessing  the “Royal Prisoners”— wanted the privilege of putting us to death himself, and   and his troops were desirous of exhibiting us in the Streets of
4 November 1838 • Sunday
<4> Sunday 4. We were visited by some Ladies and Gentlemen— One of the Women came up  and very candidly enquired of the troops, which of the prisoners was the Lord whom  the Mormons worshipped? one of the guard pointed to me with a significant smile,  and said “this is he.” The woman then turning to me, inquired whether I professed  to be Lord and Savior? I replied, that I professed to be nothing but a Man, and a  minister of Salvation sent by Jesus Christ to preach the Gospel. This answer so surprised the  woman, that she began to inquire into our doctrine; and I preached a discourse both to her, and [p. 853]
November 2 and otherwise, under their Commander , marched out of their town, through the space into our square, formed a hollow square, and grounded their arms. then rode forward and delivered up to me his sword and pistols, I then directed a company from the respective Brigades, to form a front, rear, right and left, plank guards, and to march the Prisoners back to , and protect and take charge of them until the next morning. I then detailed a Company from ’s command, to take charge of the arms. Then, in order to gratify the army and to let the Mormons see our forces, marched around the Town, and through the principal Streets, and back to head quarters. Considering the war at an end in this place, I issued orders for ’s Brigade, with the exception of one Company and Gen. Graham’s Brigade, to take up their line of March for their respective head Quarters, and dismiss their men— and directed to take charge of the prisoners (demanded for trial) and arms, and to march them to my Head Quarters at , to await further orders, and to dismiss all except a guard for the prisoners and arms. Nov.r 2nd. I relieved the guard placed over the Prisoners at by 4 Companies of Brigade, and placed them under the command of Col Thompson, 2 Brig, 3 Div. with instructions to report to . The balance of brigade with ’s Company, of ’s Brigade under the command of , I ordered to , a Mormon Town in Daviess County, with instructions to disarm the Mormon forces at that place, and to leave a guard of 50 men for the protection of prisoners, and to report to . In order to carry the treaty and stipulation, into effect, I have required your Aid de-camp, Col Williams, together with Col. Burch and , of , to attend to drawing up the papers legally, and directed Col. Thompson to wait on them with a portion of his command, and to cause all their orders and requirements, consistent with the stipulations to be carried into effect. This day about 12 o’clock there was a Battalion of 100 men from Platte arrived at , which I ordered back, having understood that would be on in a day or two, with sufficient force to operate in and , and for any service that may be required.” “— Major General— Commanding— ”
3 November 1838 • Saturday
3. Joseph, hurried across the Saturday 3. We continued our March and arrived at the which separated us from , where we hurried across the ferry when but few troops passed. The truth was had sent an express from to , to have the Prisoners sent to him, and thus prevent our going to , both armies being competitors for the honor of possessing the “Royal Prisoners”— wanted the privilege of putting us to death himself, and and his troops were desirous of exhibiting us in the Streets of
4 November 1838 • Sunday
4 Sunday 4. We were visited by some Ladies and Gentlemen— One of the Women came up and very candidly enquired of the troops, which of the prisoners was the Lord whom the Mormons worshipped? one of the guard pointed to me with a significant smile, and said “this is he.” The woman then turning to me, inquired whether I professed to be Lord and Savior? I replied, that I professed to be nothing but a Man, and a minister of Salvation sent by Jesus Christ to preach the Gospel. This answer so surprised the woman, that she began to inquire into our doctrine; and I preached a discourse both to her, and [p. 853]
Page 853